Jason Reynolds

WYSO

A pedestrian passes a makeshift memorial for the slain and injured victims of a mass shooting that occurred in the Oregon District in Dayton, Ohio.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

In the wake of last year’s mass shooting in Dayton, many Ohioans called for gun reform. Gov. Mike DeWine and other lawmakers, both Republican and Democrat, came up with multi-point plans and introduced legislation. But a year later, nothing has happened.

Avery Elementary School in Hilliard on May 11, 2020.
Ryan Hitchcock / WOSU

Ohio teachers and union leaders called on the U.S. Senate to pass a COVID-19 relief bill immediately on Monday afternoon.

Professors’ unions at Wright State and Miami University are warning of problems to come when students return to campus this fall. 

More than a dozen chapters of the American Association of University Professors have signed an open letter to college administrators, warning of a potential “superspreader event” as campuses reopen.

Yellow Springs is the first community in Ohio to require people to wear facemasks in public during the pandemic.

On Friday morning, Village Councilman Brian Housh was walking through downtown Yellow Springs, wearing a mask and putting up signs asking others to do the same.

“Our residents have made it really clear that they wanted more action taken,” Housh said. “And in light of spikes [in coronavirus cases] in Greene County and Montgomery County, this is something that’s not going away.”

Governor Mike DeWine has picked Kari Gunter-Seymour to be Ohio’s new poet laureate.

In the middle of a pandemic and nationwide protests, Kari Gunter-Seymour says poetry is more important than ever.

“When we write our truths, we bring things to light and create understanding. And from there we grow and find our way through these things that are so difficult for us right now,” she says.

And Ohio's new poet laureate won’t be resting on her laurels. Gunter-Seymour says she applied for the position because it would allow her to bring poetry to people in need.

It’s National Library Week, which usually means big events at libraries all across the country. Unfortunately, most libraries are closed right now. So, librarians are moving the party online and reaching their patrons in some pretty creative ways.

The slogan for National Library Week was supposed to be “Find Your Place at the Library.” That was before the coronavirus outbreak.

Police officers in riot gear stand on Third Street as a small Indiana Klan group rallied in Courthouse Square in 2019..
Jess Mador / WYSO

The KKK-affiliated, Indiana-based hate group that rallied in Dayton last year has applied for a permit to do it again this fall.

When a tornado tore through Old North Dayton on Memorial Day, one of the buildings destroyed was the neighborhood's last affordable, full-service grocery store.

Eight months later, that family shop is still working to reopen, so the neighborhood association and a local ministry are offering residents free rides to the nearest supermarket. WYSO News Reporter Jason Reynolds went shopping with them.

Seven months since the Memorial Day tornadoes left a path of devastation across the Miami Valley, some residents in Old North Dayton are struggling to return to normal and many homes that suffered damage in the storm remain covered with tarps or sit in disrepair.

After the Memorial Day tornado outbreak, many Old North Dayton residents donated to their neighborhood association instead of giving to regional or national groups such as the Red Cross or the Dayton Foundation.

The Old North Dayton Neighborhood Association is organizing a new effort to transport residents to nearby grocery stores after a tornado ripped apart the area's only full-service grocery. The neighborhood was among the hardest-hit in the Miami Valley Memorial Day tornado outbreak.

Stacy Meyers works at Evans Bakery in Old North Dayton. The mother of five also lives in the neighborhood and says she’s been spending $50 to $100 more on food for her family each week since the tornado destroyed the Grocery Lane store.

Oakwood city officials are promising to review police policies and continue a program in anti-bias training for officers.

At an Oakwood City Council meeting Monday night, officials addressed a report released this fall by the nonprofit Legal Aid firm Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, or ABLE, which found one-third of all Oakwood traffic tickets written in 2016 went to black drivers in a city with a black population of less than 1 percent.

Oakwood officials dispute the report’s methodology and say its data isn’t comprehensive or conclusive.

A bouncer whose actions are credited by many with saving lives during last month’s mass shooting in the Oregon District was honored Sunday. 

At the Antioch Shrine in downtown Dayton, Ned Peppers bouncer Jeremy Ganger received an embroidered jacket with the city skyline on the back, along with the words “Dayton’s Protector,” written over the heart. 

The Miami Valley’s first medical marijuana dispensary held its grand opening Thursday. Mad River Remedies in Riverside offers 20 types of medical marijuana to registered patients with one of 21 state-approved medical conditions.

Sinclair Community College in Dayton.
Sinclair Community College / Flickr

A coalition of Miami Valley community colleges and industry groups is launching a new program that aims to close the manufacturing skills gap.

Residents of some tornado-damaged properties in Harrison Township have issued words of warning to prospective looters.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Tornado cleanup continues in Harrison Township, where three twisters touched down on Memorial Day, leaving wreckage from one end of the township to the other.

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