Jason Reynolds

WYSO

When a tornado tore through Old North Dayton on Memorial Day, one of the buildings destroyed was the neighborhood's last affordable, full-service grocery store.

Seven months since the Memorial Day tornadoes left a path of devastation across the Miami Valley, some residents in Old North Dayton are struggling to return to normal and many homes that suffered damage in the storm remain covered with tarps or sit in disrepair.

After the Memorial Day tornado outbreak, many Old North Dayton residents donated to their neighborhood association instead of giving to regional or national groups such as the Red Cross or the Dayton Foundation.

The Old North Dayton Neighborhood Association is organizing a new effort to transport residents to nearby grocery stores after a tornado ripped apart the area's only full-service grocery. The neighborhood was among the hardest-hit in the Miami Valley Memorial Day tornado outbreak.

Stacy Meyers works at Evans Bakery in Old North Dayton. The mother of five also lives in the neighborhood and says she’s been spending $50 to $100 more on food for her family each week since the tornado destroyed the Grocery Lane store.

Oakwood city officials are promising to review police policies and continue a program in anti-bias training for officers.

At an Oakwood City Council meeting Monday night, officials addressed a report released this fall by the nonprofit Legal Aid firm Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, or ABLE, which found one-third of all Oakwood traffic tickets written in 2016 went to black drivers in a city with a black population of less than 1 percent.

Oakwood officials dispute the report’s methodology and say its data isn’t comprehensive or conclusive.

A bouncer whose actions are credited by many with saving lives during last month’s mass shooting in the Oregon District was honored Sunday. 

At the Antioch Shrine in downtown Dayton, Ned Peppers bouncer Jeremy Ganger received an embroidered jacket with the city skyline on the back, along with the words “Dayton’s Protector,” written over the heart. 

The Miami Valley’s first medical marijuana dispensary held its grand opening Thursday. Mad River Remedies in Riverside offers 20 types of medical marijuana to registered patients with one of 21 state-approved medical conditions.

Sinclair Community College in Dayton.
Sinclair Community College / Flickr

A coalition of Miami Valley community colleges and industry groups is launching a new program that aims to close the manufacturing skills gap.

Residents of some tornado-damaged properties in Harrison Township have issued words of warning to prospective looters.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Tornado cleanup continues in Harrison Township, where three twisters touched down on Memorial Day, leaving wreckage from one end of the township to the other.

Online retail giant Amazon is hosting employment information sessions across the Miami Valley this week. The first was held Monday morning in Wilmington, where Amazon officials say they’re looking to hire hundreds of new workers at the company's new facility at Wilmington Air Park.

The jobs sorting packages and moving cargo are expected to start at $15 an hour -- a prospect that had attracted more than two dozen job seekers by 8 a.m. 

Weapons for sale at Mad River Armory and Range in Springfield.
Jason Reynolds / WYSO

Ohio lawmakers are considering a long-debated bill that would roll back concealed-carry gun permit and training regulations. Some states have already passed similar controversial laws, while others have gone in the opposite direction to tighten gun sale, permit and background-check rules.

The opioid epidemic has touched the lives of thousands of people across the Miami Valley. As part of our coverage of the crisis, WYSO wanted to know what our listeners wanted to know. We collected dozens of questions, a lot of them from people wondering how best to help a loved one struggling with addiction or recovery, and how to find support for themselves.