James Doubek

James Doubek is an associate producer and reporter for NPR. He frequently covers breaking news for NPR.org and NPR's hourly newscast. In 2018, he reported feature stories for NPR's business desk on topics including electric scooters, cryptocurrency, and small business owners who lost out when Amazon made a deal with Apple.

In the fall of that year, Doubek was selected for NPR's internal enrichment rotation to work as an audio producer for Weekend Edition. He spent two months pitching, producing, and editing interviews and pieces for broadcast.

As an associate producer for NPR's digital content team, Doubek edits online stories and manages NPR's website and social media presence.

He got his start at NPR as an intern at the Washington Desk, where he made frequent trips to the Supreme Court and reported on political campaigns.

Bitcoin has lost a lot of its value this month. Financial experts aren't sure why. And they're not sure where the popular cryptocurrency will go next.

Prices fell last weekend, reaching below $3,600 at one point — about 40 percent less from where it had been just two weeks earlier. Prices continued down Monday but closed slightly up Tuesday.

Then they surged, topping $4,300 Wednesday — though that's nowhere near the $6,000 or more the cryptocurrency commanded for several months until mid-November.

Retailers opened their doors Friday morning — or simply left them open since Thursday night — for a busy Black Friday shopping day both in stores and online.

A big car company is going small. Ford is buying electric scooter company Spin.

Ford and Spin won't confirm the price tag, but reports put the purchase price at $100 million and an overall investment from Ford of $200 million.

This Sunday 100 years ago, Nov. 11, 1918, the Allies of World War I and Germany agreed to a cease-fire signifying the end of the "war to end all wars."

Representatives of the two sides signed the agreement in Compiègne Forest, in northern France, on the day of the year now recognized as Armistice Day.

It came into effect at 11 a.m. French time: "the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month."

Fenton Caldwell was in France that day, too — or, technically, over it. Hundreds of miles to the south, near Bordeaux.

Saturday Night Live packed in a couple of special appearances from unexpected guests, including Robert De Niro and Rep.-elect Dan Crenshaw.

Here's brief roundup of the show's political bits this week:

The show opened by bidding adieu to Jeff Sessions with Kate McKinnon reprising her role as the recently ousted attorney general.

"I don't understand what I did wrong, you know," Sessions tells Vice President Pence (Beck Bennett) as he packs up his office supplies. "I put kids in cages. I said no to gays. What more did y'all want?"

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

A lone gunman carrying a .45-caliber pistol killed 12 people at a country music bar in Thousand Oaks, Calif., late Wednesday, authorities say. When the shooting started, the Borderline Bar & Grill likely held hundreds of people, drawn by the weekly "College Country Night."

The dead include Sgt. Ron Helus, a 29-year veteran of law enforcement who went into the nightclub within minutes of receiving an emergency call. As many as 15 people inside the bar were injured, and one person had a minor gunshot wound.

Updated at 6:50 a.m. ET Monday

The alternative social media network that was reportedly used by the suspect in the deadly shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue is now down.

The Boston Red Sox stand one win away from their ninth World Series title after defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers 9-6 in Game 4 of the best of seven contest.

Los Angeles third baseman Justin Turner took the game's first run in the bottom of the sixth and the Dodgers took a 4-0 lead when right-fielder Yasiel Puig hit a three-run homer off of Boston's Eduardo Rodriguez — who slammed his glove in frustration.

Pearce scored the fifth run of the top of the ninth on a single from Xander Bogaerts.

The Department of Justice is accusing a Singaporean trader of helping North Korea circumvent sanctions, saying Tan Wee Beng laundered millions of dollars through the U.S. and Singapore.

"Tan Wee Beng and his co-conspirators made deliberate efforts to launder money through the U.S. financial system on behalf of North Korea," Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement on Thursday from the agency announcing the DOJ's charges.

President Trump said the U.S. will withdraw from a decades-old treaty with Russia that eliminated a class of nuclear weapons after he accused Russia of violating the treaty.

"We're the ones that have stayed in the agreement and we've honored the agreement, but Russia has not unfortunately honored the agreement," Trump told reporters in Nevada, "so we're going to terminate the agreement, we're going to pull out."

An American graduate student will be allowed to study in Israel after Israel's Supreme Court overturned a lower court ruling barring her from entering the country over her past involvement in a boycott movement.

Lara Alqasem, 22, of Florida, had been detained at Ben-Gurion International Airport since arriving on Oct. 2. She has a student visa from an Israeli consulate and had enrolled to study human rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Authorities accused her of supporting the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement, known as BDS, against Israel.

Saturday Night Live returned with its second episode of the 44th season, imagining the locker room talk among Senate Republicans on a day that marked a big victory for conservatives as Brett Kavanaugh became the newest Supreme Court justice.

The Department of Transportation has announced new federal voluntary guidance on the development and use of automated vehicles — with the goal of "removing unnecessary barriers" to innovation.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Authorities in South Carolina are in mourning after seven law enforcement officers were shot yesterday in Florence, S.C. One of those officers has died. NPR's James Doubek has more.

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET Sunday

Saturday Night Live kicked off its 44th season in a sketch many of us expected in some form or another: a send-up of the emotionally charged hearings into the sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

The show skipped any impression of accuser Christine Blasey Ford's testimony, starting the scene just before Kavanaugh's entrance.

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