Hannah Hagemann

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced a series of administrative orders on Monday that will require the police department to reform its use-of-force rules and amp up de-escalation tactics, three days after Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed by a police officer.

"Friday evening we saw the murder of Rayshard Brooks," Bottoms said in a press conference, "It is clear that we do not have another day, another minute, another hour to waste."

Republican Rep. Denver Riggleman, who received blowback from some members of his party after officiating the same-sex wedding last year of former campaign volunteers, has lost the GOP nomination for his central Virginia seat.

Updated at 3:30 a.m. ET on Thursday

What appeared to be overwhelmingly peaceful protests compared to earlier days persisted Wednesday across the U.S.

Updated at 11:44 a.m. ET

One week after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis Police custody, demonstrations against police brutality and systemic racism continued across the United States. Many cities imposed curfews, and President Trump again warned he would order active duty military forces to restore order if state and local governments, in his judgement, failed to do so.

Here are details of some protests around the country.

St. Louis

Amid continuing protests over the death of George Floyd, Target has temporarily closed or adjusted hours at more than 200 stores nationwide.

Updated at 1:42 p.m. ET Saturday

Angry protests nationwide on Friday followed the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis. Clashes erupted between activists and law enforcement in many locations, and at least two people were dead by Saturday morning.

New York is "decidedly in the reopening phase," Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Sunday, as the state hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic gave sports leagues, campgrounds and veterinarian offices the green light to start up again, with modifications.

Professional sports leagues in the state are now able to begin training camps, Cuomo said during his daily press conference, adding that having teams come back, even without spectators, would mark a "return to normalcy."

In March, as states across the country began implementing stay-at-home orders and commuters got off the road, traffic dropped, but a new National Safety Council report finds that the number of motor vehicle fatalities per miles driven increased by 14% compared with the March 2019 rate.

Congressional Democrats announced Saturday they're requesting all records and documents regarding President Trump's decision to fire State Department Inspector General Steve Linick, the fourth government watchdog Trump has fired or sought to remove in the last six weeks.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a set of documents on Thursday designed to provide guidance on how child care centers, schools, restaurants and bars, and other establishments could begin the process of reopening in the face of the coron

Eighteen of California's 58 counties have received state approval to further ease coronavirus restrictions, but major population centers such as the San Francisco Bay Area are choosing not to relax stay-at-home orders for now.

Wisconsin's Supreme Court has overturned the state's "Safer at Home" orders and mandated that all future statewide restrictions to battle the coronavirus must be approved by the legislature's rule-making committee before they could be implemented.

The court ruled to strike down the orders 4-3 on Wednesday, with conservative Justice Brian Hagedorn dissenting.

The worst of the nation's historic job losses are yet to come, according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told Fox News Sunday that "the reported numbers are probably going to get worse before they get better."

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation announced Thursday that it has arrested two white men in the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old unarmed black man who was shot and killed in February while jogging in the Satilla Shores neighborhood in Glynn County, Ga.

After being treated on Tuesday for a gallbladder infection at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was discharged on Wednesday.

"She is doing well and glad to be home," according to a Supreme Court press release.

The court said over the next few weeks Ginsburg will return to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up outpatient visits, and for a nonsurgical procedure to remove the gallstone.

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