Ella Abbott | WOSU Radio

Ella Abbott

Ella Abbott is studying journalism and forensic anthropology at Kent State. Abbott has previously held the positions of senior reporter for the Kent Stater, the university’s student run newspaper, and editor-in-chief of Fusion magazine, Kent State’s LGBTQ magazine. Her interests are in public policy and crime.

Ella Abbott / WKSU

Cleveland will be hosting its first Welcome Week next month. The event is intended to celebrate immigrants in the community.

Photographer Johnny Joo photographed an abandoned Rolling Acres Mall with a layer of snow.
Johnny Joo / Odd World Studio

In an effort to understand Ohio, an Akron-based author is traveling around the state. David Giffels believes the key to understanding the country ahead of the 2020 presidential election begins in his own backyard.

His quest continues this month by looking at the realities of Ohio’s economy and the president’s promises to bring jobs back into the area.

Kent State researchers have received a grant to study a type of evergreen tree common on the east coast that’s changing the landscape as it moves west.

The university has received $914,000 from the National Science Foundation to understand how the Eastern Red Cedar tree is spreading.

David Ward is a professor of biological sciences and will be leading the project. He says the tree's expansion has broader implications.

The head of Hudson-based Joann Stores joined other business leaders to speak out about the impacts tariffs are having on their companies.

Last week, President Trump announced a 10 percent tariff on $300 billion of Chinese goods. It’s set to take effect September 1.

In a call with reporters Wednesday, Wade Miquelon says the tariffs don’t take into account that many of these businesses have developed their supply chains over years and don’t have alternatives.

A gun control advocate says two provisions passed by Congress are prohibiting efforts to address gun violence.

Paul Helmke is the former president and CEO of the Brady Center, a nonprofit which advocates for gun control.

He spoke at the Akron Roundtable as part of their point-counterpoint discussion on gun violence.

Helmke, a Republican, also used to be mayor of Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Northeast Ohio residents have until midnight tonight to weigh in on how they would improve the arts in Akron.

ArtsNow launched the Akron Cultural Plan survey in June as the first step in gathering information from people who live, work and play in Akron.

Nicole Mullet is the executive director of the non-profit. She says often people will tell her they aren’t involved in the arts, but then find out they’re affected by it in ways they hadn’t realized – such as school art programs or church choirs.

Ohio is making back-to-school shopping a little easier this weekend. The state’s Sales Tax Holiday begins Friday and runs until Sunday.

The holiday provides an exemption on sales tax for certain back-to-school items at all Ohio stores, both online and in-store.

Tim Lynch is the Legislative Director for the Ohio Department of Taxation. He says it’s an effort to bring more business to Ohio retailers and make school supply shopping easier for families.

Sen. Sherrod Brown has unveiled new legislation Wednesday to put company profits back in the hands of workers.

Brown says the "Stock Buyback Reform and Worker Dividend Act" seeks to curb stock buybacks.

He says corporations’ main goal is to increase stock prices each quarter and increasingly they do this through purchasing their own stock.

“When President Trump and Mitch McConnell handed them the windfall in the 2017 tax law, those executives turned around and plowed that money right back into stock buybacks.”

A new hybrid bird species has been spotted around parks in northeast Ohio.

The bird is a type of warbler resulting from mating between Cerulean Warblers and Northern Parulas.

Park Ranger Ryan Trimbath was the first to spot the bird in 2014 while he was working for the Summit Metro Parks in Deep Lock Quarry.

He says the experience has opened his mind to when people claim to see new species.

Playhouse Square’s “Advancing the Legacy” campaign exceeded its $100 million goal expectation.The performing arts organization announced last week raised $110 million over the past five years.

Art Falco is the retired CEO of Playhouse Square who now serves as a senior advisor. He said organization is grateful to community members who recognize how important the theater district is.

Following a national search, Kent State’s Liquid Crystal Institute found its new director right on campus.

The university introduced Torsten Hegmann today at an event that included several department heads. Hegmann has been at Kent since 2011 and an assistant director of the institute for the past year.

Kent State President, Todd Diacon, said he expects Hegmann to be a collaborative leader.

David Giffels believes the journey to understanding America begins with Ohio. Traveling around the state, the Akron-based writer is working on a new book ahead of next year’s election.

Local leaders are trying to help Summit County flood victims.

State Rep. Tavia Galonski (D-Akron) met with  several mayors, directors of state agencies and Governor Mike DeWine this week in Barbertion. Mayor William Judge organized the meeting.

Galonski said there is hope for financial help for those affected by flooding.

Stark Parks is seeking a property tax increase to expand trails and facilities. The park district’s current levy of 1-mill expires at the end of next year and they’re looking to generate more funding.

The director of Stark County Park District, Bob Fonte, said they conducted a survey along with updating the five-year plan for the parks. He said the increase would help fund the things park goers have asked for.

Akron city leaders are crediting residents for helping to keep the city clean.

Keep Akron Beautiful released the results of its annual Community Appearance Index. A group of volunteers spend a few hours each June surveying the city for litter, temporary illegal signage and graffiti.

This year, the city scored a "1," the lowest possible score, for litter.

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