David Williams | WOSU Radio

David Williams

David Williams is an intern at WKSU for summer 2019. A junior at Kent State, Williams is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in multimedia journalism. Williams has reported for The Kent Stater, the university’s student-run newspaper, since spring 2018. His interests include history and politics.

Empty Bin Zero Waste

Ohio’s first zero-waste store is now open for business. The Canton store sells reusable items to replace single-use disposables like straws, facial wipes and sandwich bags.

The Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland is introducing a new program intended to line up funding for community development projects.

It has launched an online tool, called Investment Connection, that allows community-based organizations to propose eligible projects to various financial institutions.

Assistant Vice President of Community Development Mary Helen Petrus said the Fed is specifically interested in proposals affecting low-income areas in Appalachia.

Congressman Tim Ryan is joining Moms Demand Action on what he’s calling a caravan for change. Ryan (D-OH 13th district) stopped briefly in Cuyahoga Falls Wednesday morning on his way to Kentucky, the home state of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The group is urging McConnell to bring House-passed gun control legislation before the Senate. 

Educators and Administrators from around Northeast Ohio are attending a summit at Kent State this week, intended to better prepare them to teach the next generation of students about the history and legacy of May 4.

One of the speakers they heard from is Syrian immigrant, poet and activist Sara Abou Rashed. She believes it's important to accommodate students of all backgrounds. She spoke about the hurdles she faced transitioning to a new education system in a different language. She says the words of one teacher really stuck with her.

In honor of the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement week, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has created an exhibit that spotlights the connection between rock and football.

The exhibit includes football memorabilia like the helmet Roger Daltrey of the Who wore on the cover of the “Odds and Sods” album.

Rock Hall CEO Greg Harris said rock and football have always had a connection.

The Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District will be getting a facelift. The board of directors has approved a $65 million plan to improve infrastructure, camping and portions of the waterfront.

The improvements are the second phase in the district’s master plan, which spent $130 million on phase one.

Deputy Chief of Planning and Projects Eric Stechshulte says phase two focuses on bringing more activities to the park, but he says they’re not done there.

A University of Akron study found good news and bad news for veterans looking for jobs after leaving military service.

Veterans contribute nearly 8% of Ohio’s total income, earning nearly $5 more per hour than non-veterans, but that number shrinks as veterans pursue higher paying jobs.

Economics professor Amanda Weinstein said this disparity eventually affects all working veterans.

Cuyahoga Falls is the first city in Ohio to offer DogSpot locations. DogSpot is a temperature controlled doghouse. The city will offer two of them downtown. DogSpot typically charges 30 cents per minute to use the unit, but the city of Cuyahoga Falls is sponsoring the houses at $500 per month through the end of the year. That means pet owners can use them for free.  

Cuyahoga Falls Mayor Don Walters hopes DogSpots will bring more people to the city, and more customers downtown.

Fire crews in Wooster are assessing the damage after heavy rains swept through and flooded much of Wayne County Sunday. Wayne is one of 63 Ohio counties under a state of emergency because of damage from severe weather.

Parts of the county got as much as 5 inches of rain over a short period of time.

A Cleveland Chef is taking another step to help people who have fallen on hard times. Brandon Chrostowski is helping a community nonprofit open a pizza shop called Ohio City Pizzeria.

Chrostowski is the founder and CEO of Edwin’s restaurant, where he trains and employs former inmates. This new venture has a similar mission.

As a potentially deadly heat wave with high humidity sweeps across the eastern United States, some Northeast Ohio cities are taking precautions. 

The following cities are offering cooling centers to their residents, with some even providing transportation:

Akron

Local community centers have extended their hours and will be open from 8:30 a.m. until 9:00 p.m. through Saturday.

Lawton Street Community Center, 1225 Lawton St.

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., based in Akron, was involved in the Apollo 11 mission 50 years ago. The company developed several components, including the flotation device for when the capsule splashed down.

This Sunday Goodyear and NASA team up again to launch an experiment to the International Space Station to see how silica can be reinforced in different environments.

Northeast Ohio is facing a labor shortage. That’s according to a report from Team NEO analyzing supply and demand in Northeast Ohio’s labor Market.

Team NEO’s Vice President of Strategy and Research Jacob Duritsky said the demand for health care, nursing and manufacturing jobs outweighs the number of qualified people entering the workforce.

“In those key sectors of the economy, we aren’t pushing enough students out of our programs into those fields where really good opportunity exists,” Duritsky said.

A Stark County nonprofit that offers addiction and mental health treatment has received its largest ever contribution. The Timken Foundation awarded a $1.6 million grant to CommQuest Services.

CommQuest President and Chief Executive Officer Keith Hochadel said the grant will be used for facility repair, so they can put operational dollars towards helping people.

A state labor market study finds unemployment increasing in northeast Ohio, but in Akron there’s one bright spot in the data. The value of new home construction has risen nearly 47 percent in the last year.

The report from Ohio Bureau of Labor Market Information looked at eight metropolitan areas. It found unemployment claims in Akron rose 3.3 percent, and in Cleveland nearly six percent. Both cities also saw a decline in manufacturing hours worked, down nearly five percent in Cleveland.

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