Dana Farrington

Dana Farrington is a digital editor coordinating online coverage on the Washington Desk — from daily stories to visual feature projects to the weekly newsletter. She has been with the NPR Politics team since President Trump's inauguration. Before that, she was among NPR's first engagement editors, managing the homepage for NPR.org and the main social accounts. Dana has also worked as a weekend web producer and editor, and has written on a wide range of topics for NPR, including tech and women's health.

Before joining NPR in 2011, Dana was a web producer for member station WAMU in Washington, D.C.

Dana studied journalism at New York University and got her first taste of public radio in high school on a teen radio show for KUSP in Santa Cruz, Calif.

Updated 9:15 a.m. ET

Mark Meadows, the chief of staff to President Trump, has tested positive for the coronavirus. He is the latest person in the president's inner circle to catch the virus, which is surging across the country.

Meadows was last seen by reporters on election night, when Trump gave a defiant speech to supporters packed into the East Room of the White House. Meadows walked into the room ahead of Trump's adult children just ahead of his remarks.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

Demonstrators supporting and opposing Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett gathered on Capitol Hill Monday as her confirmation hearings began, with health — from the coronavirus, to the Affordable Care Act and abortion — as a major focus.

Updated at 9:59 p.m. ET

President Trump tweeted a video update from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Saturday night.

"I came here, wasn't feeling so well. I feel much better now," he said. "We're working hard to get me all the way back. I have to be back because we still have to make America great again. We've done an awfully good job of that, but we still have steps to go and we have to finish that job. And I'll be back — I think I'll be back soon."

Former President Barack Obama says he shares the "anguish" that many feel about George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody in Minnesota.

Floyd's death has sparked days of protests in Minneapolis. President Trump blamed the unrest on "thugs" in a tweet that was later hidden by Twitter for "glorifying violence."

Updated at 2:42 p.m. ET

President Trump declared victory on Thursday, a day after being acquitted by the Senate on two articles of impeachment, and lashed out at his political opponents in lengthy extemporaneous remarks.

"We went through hell, unfairly. I did nothing wrong," he said in a public statement from the White House.

"It was all bulls***," he said, tracing his impeachment woes back to investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign.

Opening arguments for both sides in the Trump impeachment trial ended on Tuesday. The trial isn't over, but the core argument in each side's case is clear.

The Senate is scheduled to vote on President Trump's fate on Wednesday at 4 p.m. ET after about two weeks of his impeachment trial.

The House of Representatives impeached the president in December, charging him with abusing his power and obstructing Congress for efforts to get Ukraine to investigate Trump's political rivals.

Amid a slew of public impeachment hearings, Democratic presidential candidates are gathering in Atlanta to debate once again. This round also comes less than three months before the first primaries and caucuses.

Ten candidates made the cut, down from a record of 12 in October's debate.

The House committees leading the impeachment inquiry into President Trump have released the transcript of their interview with former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch.

Updated on Jan. 20 at 11:15 p.m. ET

Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is dead, President Trump announced on Sunday. The ISIS founder died in a U.S. special operation on Saturday.

In an address from the White House, Trump said Baghdadi died after being cornered by U.S. forces and detonating his own suicide vest. Trump said Baghdadi's remains had been positively identified.

"He died like a dog. He died like a coward," the president said.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney acknowledged Thursday that President Trump expected concessions from Ukraine's president in exchange for engagement — but said that's just how business is done in diplomacy.

Mulvaney was asked whether it was a quid pro quo for the White House to condition a meeting between Trump and Ukraine's president on an agreement by Ukraine to launch an investigation that might help Trump politically.

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET

White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney acknowledged several substantial facts about the Ukraine affair on Thursday — but disputed that it was inappropriate or that the administration even was trying to hide what it had done.

Mulvaney acknowledged that President Trump expected concessions from his Ukrainian counterpart in exchange for engagement and also that Trump had empowered his personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, to run what has been called a parallel foreign policy for Ukraine on his own.

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, is speaking to Congress behind closed doors on Thursday as part of the House's impeachment inquiry into President Trump.

In his prepared remarks, the former businessman says: "as we go through this process, I understand that some people may have their own specific agendas: some may want me to say things to protect the President at all costs; some may want me to provide damning facts to support the other side. But none of that matters to me. ... Simply put, I am NOT here to push an agenda. I am here to tell the truth."

Updated at 12:33 p.m. ET

President Trump said Monday that his door might be open for meetings with Iran's president and China's leader as he concluded his visit to the G-7 summit in France, but it isn't clear what if any action may come next.

Trump said he believes Beijing "wants a deal very badly" to end its trade war with Washington and that he'd consider meeting with Iran's president if Tehran came to terms over its nuclear program.

"If the circumstances were correct or right I would certainly agree to that," Trump said.

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