Chris Arnold

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Have you or someone close to you been struggling with medical bills you can't pay. NPR is doing a story about the best strategies for dealing with medical debt for a series on personal finance, and we want to hear your story! We'd also like to know if you found a good solution — for example working with a financial assistance counselor at a hospital or non-profit organization or some other strategy.

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Updated at 9:47 a.m. ET Thursday

Jack Bogle, the founder of Vanguard who made investing and retirement affordable for millions, died Wednesday at the age of 89, the company said.

Bogle transformed the way people invest their money when he created the first index mutual fund for individual investors in 1975.

NPR is doing a series of personal finance stories, including a look at how to avoid dreaded bank overdraft fees and super-high interest rates.

If you've been hit with lots of banking fees or been stuck paying high-cost credit card debt, we want to hear from you. We would also love to hear solutions and tips that you've figured out if you've put those days behind you.

Your responses may be used in an upcoming podcast, on air or on NPR.org. A producer may reach out to you to follow up, too. Share your thoughts with us below.

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For public school teacher Kaitlyn McCollum, even simple acts like washing dishes or taking a shower can fill her with dread.

"It will just hit me like a ton of bricks," McCollum says. " 'Oh my God, I owe all of that money.' And it's, like, a knee-buckling moment of panic all over again."

She and her family recently moved to a much smaller, older house. One big reason for the downsizing: a $24,000 loan that McCollum has been unfairly saddled with because of a paperwork debacle at the U.S. Department of Education.

NPR is doing a series of personal finance stories with some looking at the best ways to make a budget and stick to it.

We want to hear from people who are having trouble managing their spending and need to find a better way, as well as those who think they've found the perfect budgeting system and want to share your tips on what's worked.

NPR is doing a series of personal finance stories, with some focused on the best way to invest for retirement.

Are you wondering if you're paying too much in fees or how to divide up your investments among stocks, bonds and real estate funds? Maybe you're thinking you might need a financial adviser, or are wondering how to find one who will act in your best interest. Or maybe, you're trying to find the best way to actually set aside money to save and invest for the future if money feels tight right now.

If your credit card bills or other debt has piled up and you wish you had some good strategies for paying off these bills, NPR wants to hear from you.

Your responses may be used in an upcoming story, on air or on NPR.org. A producer may reach out to you to follow up on your response, too. Share your thoughts with us below — or here — and send us a voice memo.

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More progress this morning on trade negotiations between the U.S. and Canada.

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Even in a strong economy, many Americans live paycheck to paycheck. Forty percent don't have $400 to cover an emergency expense, such as a car repair. And many working-class people turn to payday loans or other costly ways to borrow money. But more companies are stepping in to help their workers with a much cheaper way to get some emergency cash.

Startup companies that offer better options for workers are partnering with all kinds of businesses — from giants like Walmart to little fried chicken restaurants.

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The Trump administration is taking aim at a law designed to protect military service members from getting cheated by shady lending practices.

NPR has obtained documents that show the White House is proposing changes that critics say would leave service members vulnerable to getting ripped off when they buy cars. Separately, the administration is taking broader steps to roll back enforcement of the Military Lending Act.

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