Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

With November 3rd, the last day of the presidential election, rapidly approaching, officials with the U.S. Postal Service say they have already processed a record amount of election mail this year.

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Updated at 10:51 a.m. ET

Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee moved Thursday to advance the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court, bringing President Trump's nominee within striking distance of confirmation and the court a step closer to a 6-3 conservative majority.

The U.S. Postal Service has settled a lawsuit in Montana that called on it to reverse service cutbacks in advance of next month's election. The suit was brought by Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat, who is running for the U.S. Senate.

In a statement, Bullock said the settlement "will ensure stability through and beyond the election by immediately restoring the mail services folks rely on."

The Postal Service said it agreed to the settlement because "it has always been our goal to ensure that anyone who chooses to utilize the mail to vote can do so successfully."

This is scheduled to be the last day of Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Senate confirmation hearings, and after two days of questioning Barrett, senators will turn to character witnesses and those who are concerned about her likely elevation to the Supreme Court.

Barrett will not be present.

Republicans will call on Amanda Rauh-Bieri, a former law clerk for Barrett on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, and Laura Wolk, the first blind woman to clerk on the U.S. Supreme Court and who has called Barrett her mentor.

Updated at 2:33 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee held its fourth and final day of hearings on Thursday on President Trump's nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court.

If confirmed, Barrett, 48, would replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the high court.

Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee continued to question Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett regarding her views on the Affordable Care Act, as Barrett continued to avoid stating them.

The constitutionality of the ACA is being challenged by the Trump administration and a group of Republican state attorneys general, and the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments on the case next month.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett has, like many of the recent nominees before her, been unwilling to tip her hand as to how she might rule on potential high-profile cases if confirmed to the high court.

But she also has left some hints as to her leanings, especially on the topic of abortion rights. As a University of Notre Dame Law School professor, Barrett signed an ad that stated, "It's time to put an end to the barbaric legacy of Roe v. Wade," referring to the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

In the very first question put to her in Day 2 of her Supreme Court confirmation hearings, Judge Amy Coney Barrett was asked to define, "in English," the meaning of the legal concept of originalism.

It was a bit of a softball coming from Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Barrett had no trouble knocking it out of the park.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., called on the Senate to hold off on confirming Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court "until after Americans decide who they want in the White House."

Harris, the Democratic vice presidential nominee, is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and the Barrett nomination hearing this week gives her a few moments in the spotlight in the midst of the presidential campaign.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said the Senate "should not be moving forward on this nomination" until the election is over and the next president has taken office.

Feinstein, the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, delivered her opening statement at Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation hearing on Monday.

Barrett is President Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court; Republicans intend to confirm her to the court before Election Day. There's little Democrats can do to prevent that, but they have plenty of objections.

The Senate hearing room where the Judiciary Committee is holding up to four days of hearings on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination has been set up to comply with COVID-19 safety protocols.

The Architect of the Capitol, which oversees the physical plant of the Capitol complex, says the seating arrangements in the Hart office building hearing room, as well as on the dais, where senators sit, were laid out in conjunction with the Office of Attending Physician. In addition, the ventilation in the large room "meets or exceeds industry standards."

One of this November's closest and highest-profile U.S. Senate races could turn on a unique way of voting in Maine.

Updated at 12:52 p.m.

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said Wednesday that he and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are discussing potential stand-alone bills for aid to airlines, small businesses and Americans. He said the Trump administration was "still willing to be engaged" on piecemeal aid bills, though it was not optimistic about a comprehensive aid bill.

Updated at 8:20 p.m. ET

Along with well wishes for a speedy recovery, Democratic lawmakers are lodging some criticism at President Trump following his positive coronavirus test.

"We all received that news with great sadness," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told MSNBC. "I always pray for the president and his family that they're safe."

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