Bill Chappell | WOSU Radio

Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

Britain's Parliament failed to give Prime Minister Boris Johnson the two-thirds necessary to hold snap elections next month — leaving him with little choice but to go back to the European Union to try to negotiate a new withdrawal deal.

Johnson's request came not long after the House of Commons passed a measure blocking his push to leave the European Union without a deal.

Updated at 1:05 a.m. ET Thursday

Hurricane Dorian is strengthening again and is now a Category 3 storm with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph, although "some fluctuations in intensity are expected during the next 12 hours," according to the National Hurricane Center.

At least 20 people have died in the Bahamas as a result of Dorian, local officials say.

Updated at 11:20 p.m. ET

Hurricane Dorian is predicted to hit Florida and the northern Bahamas this weekend as an extremely dangerous, slow-moving Category 4 storm, bringing intense rains and sustained winds of 130 mph, the National Hurricane Center says.

With favorable conditions and very warm waters ahead, Dorian is expected to have a fearsome growth spurt. As the NHC says in its 11 p.m. ET update, "Hurricane Hunter aircraft find a strengthening Dorian."

Updated at 5:10 a.m. ET Thursday

Hurricane Dorian is "expected to become a major hurricane on Friday," according to the National Hurricane Center.

Maximum sustained winds at 5 a.m. ET Thursday were 85 mph — a Category 1 hurricane — with higher gusts, according to the center's most recent update. Dorian was about 150 miles north northwest of Puerto Rico, moving about 13 mph toward the northwest.

Brazil says it will reject an offer of at least $22 million from the rich countries in the Group of Seven to help fight fires sweeping through the Amazon rainforest. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro says he doesn't want the money — unless it comes with an apology from French President Emmanuel Macron.

Updated at 11:12 p.m. ET

Puerto Rico is now under a hurricane watch because of Tropical Storm Dorian, meaning the island could see dangerous conditions within 24 hours.

Dorian's maximum sustained winds remain near 50 mph with higher gusts, according to the National Hurricane Center. As of 11 p.m. ET, the compact storm was about 275 miles southeast of Ponce, Puerto Rico.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET
Tropical Storm Dorian is forecast to become a hurricane in the eastern Caribbean by late Tuesday, the National Hurricane Center says, issuing warnings to Barbados and other islands in the storm's path. Puerto Rico, Haiti and other areas are also watching its progress.

The storm "is expected to be a hurricane when it moves near Puerto Rico and eastern Hispaniola" this week, the NHC says.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo says his country will create a new capital city on the island of Borneo, revealing new details about his plan to move the central government out of Jakarta. The capital's current location faces a number of problems, including the fact that it's sinking.

Widodo's announcement Monday comes months after he said he wanted to move the capital, seeking a place that can offer a break from Jakarta's environmental challenges as well as its relentlessly gridlocked traffic.

California's cannabis excise tax generated only $74.2 million in the second quarter of 2019, the state says, announcing numbers that are short of projections that were set months ago. It's the latest sign that the country's largest marijuana market has struggled to take off since sales of recreational pot became legal last year.

A Baltimore County judge has sentenced Dawnta Harris to a life term in prison for the murder of police Officer Amy Caprio. Harris was 16 when the stolen Jeep he was driving ran over Caprio, 29, in the spring of 2018.

Within days of Caprio's death, Harris was charged as an adult, facing a count of first-degree murder.

A South African court is restricting gratuitous displays of the country's old apartheid-era flag, calling the banner "a vivid symbol of white supremacy and black disenfranchisement and suppression."

Two Manhattan landlords took an unusual — and illegal — route to double their rentable space: cutting their two condos in half horizontally so they could rent out 18 tiny apartments in their Lower East Side building, according to the New York City Department of Buildings.

"The ceiling heights were 4.5 feet to 6 feet tall on each level, depending on where you were standing," Department of Buildings spokesperson Abigail Kunitz said in an email to NPR.

Police officers in California will be required to use lethal force only as a "necessary" response to a threat — not merely as an "objectively reasonable" one — under legislation that Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Monday. Under the tighter standard, deadly force is legal only in instances where there are no other options.

The U.K. economy contracted by 0.2% in the most recent quarter, feeding fears of a recession as the country approaches a deadline to exit from the European Union. The last time the economy shrank was nearly seven years ago, in late 2012. Economists had been expecting a flat quarter from the economy, not a contraction.

If the U.K. sees similar negative growth in the current quarter, the country will officially be deemed to be in a recession.

Updated at 9:08 p.m. ET

Prosecutors in Springfield, Mo., have filed formal charges of making a terrorist threat in the second degree against a 20-year-old man arrested for wearing body armor and carrying a loaded rifle — and more than 100 rounds of ammunition — at a Walmart store Thursday.

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