April Laissle | WOSU Radio

April Laissle

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

Dayton voters will decide the Dayton School Board race on Election Day, with four candidates vying for three open seats. The contest comes at a pivotal time for the school district.

To the relief of some district officials, Dayton Public Schools avoided state takeover this year.

The accomplishment came after two years of major systemic changes for the district, including teacher pay increases and a school leadership overhaul.

At a recent forum, school board candidates were quick to mention the improved state report card.

On Election Day this November, two Montgomery County school districts are asking voters to approve additional funding to maintain or improve school facilities.

West Carrollton City Schools is asking voters to help fund the construction of new schools throughout the district. The district says the state will cover 81 percent of construction costs, if voters approve the 5.6 mill bond issue. The bond would cost the owner of a $100,000 home an extra $147 per year.

Last month, two teenage boys were shot and killed inside a Dayton garage by a homeowner who says they trespassed on the property. No charges have been filed. Now, the shooting’s raising questions about how Ohio prosecutes self-defense cases.

State lawmakers recently pushed a so-called Stand Your Ground measure that would have protected people who use lethal force if they believe their lives are at risk. That proposal failed to pass.

Dozens of University of Dayton students took part in today’s Global Climate Strike, joining thousands of other young people around the world.

Students gathered at UD’s Kennedy Union Fountain this afternoon to promote environmental sustainability and urge politicians to take action against climate change.

Senior Anthony Lapham was one of several students waiting in line to sign a sustainability pledge at the event.

Some Dayton activists are preparing to participate in Friday’s Global Climate Strike. The international demonstration is meant to call attention to climate change and prompt political action to mitigate its effects.

The movement was created by students in cities around the world.

Dayton Climate Strike event coordinator Logan Martinez says organizers hope it’s the start of a longterm campaign for environmental sustainability in the Miami Valley.  

Hundreds of people are expected to attend a groundbreaking ceremony Wednesday for Gem City Market, a co-operative grocery store designed to address diminishing access to healthy food in West Dayton. 

Plans for the market have been underway since 2015. The store is set to offer fresh produce and other grocery staples. It’ll also feature a community health clinic and a teaching kitchen. 

Amaha Sellassie, president of the Gem City Market Board, says more than 2,200 people have already signed up to become members of the co-op. 

Ohio school report cards will be released Thursday, according to the Ohio Department of Education.  This year’s results were supposed to determine whether Dayton Public Schools would be taken over by an Academic Distress Commission. Three consecutive years of failing grades trigger a takeover, and the district has received failing grades for the past two years.

Police officers who killed the gunman responsible for a mass shooting in the Oregon District last month were honored in a White House ceremony on Monday.

At the event, President Trump praised the six police officers, saying they displayed “nerves of steel” during the attack that left nine people dead and dozens more injured. The officers shot and killed the gunman before he could enter Ned Peppers bar, less than 30 seconds after the  attack began.

The Kettering clinic is the region's only abortion provider still in operation.
Samuel Worley / WYSO

Attorneys for the Dayton area’s only abortion clinic are continuing to fight to keep the facility open, despite the Ohio Supreme Court’s refusal to hear their latest appeal last month.

Greene County officials are continuing to contend with massive quantities of organic debris left behind by an EF3 tornado that touched down in the area on Memorial Day.

Nearly 150,000 cubic yards of debris has been removed from Greene County properties since the storm hit -- that's enough to fill about five Olympic-sized swimming pools.

Greene County Administrator Brandon Huddleson says the debris is being stored at two sites: the county’s environmental services center and Cemex Reserve, a public park that contains wetland areas.

A union representing Montgomery County Children’s services workers is close to reaching a contract deal with the county.

County and Professional Guild of Ohio representatives have reached a “conceptual framework for a tentative agreement,” according to a joint statement released Wednesday.

Negotiations began in February and stalled this summer, after the two parties failed to agree on wage increases.

Montgomery County Coroner Kent Harshbarger says the gunman who killed nine people in the Oregon District had ingested cocaine, alcohol, and Xanax prior to the August 4 attack. Officials say full toxicology results on the shooter may take up to six weeks.

Dayton leaders are having initial discussions about erecting a permanent memorial to those who lost their lives in the Oregon District mass shooting on August 4. 

At a press conference earlier this week, Mayor Nan Whaley said the city plans to invite Oregon District business leaders, victims advocates, and other community members to form a committee focused on establishing a public display honoring the victims. 

Private funeral services have been scheduled for the 24-year-old gunman responsible for a mass shooting in Dayton’s Oregon District, and his 22-year-old sibling, who was one of the victims.

On Monday, the Betts family published obituaries for their only children on a Bellbrook funeral home’s website. The family described their son as "funny, articulate, and intelligent."  The obituary was removed Wednesday and replaced with a statement from the family: 

A friend of the gunman who killed nine people in Dayton’s Oregon District August 4 appeared in federal court Wednesday on weapons charges. 

The hearing was called to determine whether 24-year-old Ethan Kollie should be released from jail while awaiting trial.

He’s charged with lying about his drug use in order to acquire firearms.  The FBI also alleges that he provided body armor and weapons accessories used in the attack.

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