April Laissle | WOSU Radio

April Laissle

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

Ohio school report cards will be released Thursday, according to the Ohio Department of Education.  This year’s results were supposed to determine whether Dayton Public Schools would be taken over by an Academic Distress Commission. Three consecutive years of failing grades trigger a takeover, and the district has received failing grades for the past two years.

Police officers who killed the gunman responsible for a mass shooting in the Oregon District last month were honored in a White House ceremony on Monday.

At the event, President Trump praised the six police officers, saying they displayed “nerves of steel” during the attack that left nine people dead and dozens more injured. The officers shot and killed the gunman before he could enter Ned Peppers bar, less than 30 seconds after the  attack began.

Across the street from the Women's Med Center in Kettering is a "crisis pregnancy center" that counsels women against getting abortions.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Attorneys for the Dayton area’s only abortion clinic are continuing to fight to keep the facility open, despite the Ohio Supreme Court’s refusal to hear their latest appeal last month.

Greene County officials are continuing to contend with massive quantities of organic debris left behind by an EF3 tornado that touched down in the area on Memorial Day.

Nearly 150,000 cubic yards of debris has been removed from Greene County properties since the storm hit -- that's enough to fill about five Olympic-sized swimming pools.

Greene County Administrator Brandon Huddleson says the debris is being stored at two sites: the county’s environmental services center and Cemex Reserve, a public park that contains wetland areas.

A union representing Montgomery County Children’s services workers is close to reaching a contract deal with the county.

County and Professional Guild of Ohio representatives have reached a “conceptual framework for a tentative agreement,” according to a joint statement released Wednesday.

Negotiations began in February and stalled this summer, after the two parties failed to agree on wage increases.

Montgomery County Coroner Kent Harshbarger says the gunman who killed nine people in the Oregon District had ingested cocaine, alcohol, and Xanax prior to the August 4 attack. Officials say full toxicology results on the shooter may take up to six weeks.

Dayton leaders are having initial discussions about erecting a permanent memorial to those who lost their lives in the Oregon District mass shooting on August 4. 

At a press conference earlier this week, Mayor Nan Whaley said the city plans to invite Oregon District business leaders, victims advocates, and other community members to form a committee focused on establishing a public display honoring the victims. 

Private funeral services have been scheduled for the 24-year-old gunman responsible for a mass shooting in Dayton’s Oregon District, and his 22-year-old sibling, who was one of the victims.

On Monday, the Betts family published obituaries for their only children on a Bellbrook funeral home’s website. The family described their son as "funny, articulate, and intelligent."  The obituary was removed Wednesday and replaced with a statement from the family: 

A friend of the gunman who killed nine people in Dayton’s Oregon District August 4 appeared in federal court Wednesday on weapons charges. 

The hearing was called to determine whether 24-year-old Ethan Kollie should be released from jail while awaiting trial.

He’s charged with lying about his drug use in order to acquire firearms.  The FBI also alleges that he provided body armor and weapons accessories used in the attack.

New details are emerging about the investigation into the August 4 Oregon District mass shooting that left nine people dead.

A friend of the gunman who killed nine people outside an Oregon District bar Sunday Aug. 4 now faces federal charges that could send him to prison for up to 15 years.

Authorities have charged 24-year-old Ethan Kollie with illegally owning firearms, and lying about his drug use on a federal form in order to acquire them.

Kollie allegedly told FBI agents he regularly smokes marijuana and used “hard drugs” with shooter Connor Betts in 2014 and 2015.

Dayton religious leaders held services Sunday to memorialize the nine people killed in a mass shooting in the city one week ago. At one well-attended service just five miles west of the site of the shooting, the discussion turned political.

Waymen AME Chapel leaders encouraged the congregation to forgive the 24-year-old gunman, who was killed by police shortly after he opened fire. But Reverend Charles Holmes also urged action.

Tensions were high at the site of the Oregon District shooting Wednesday morning, where a crowd of about 150 people waited for President Donald Trump’s arrival in Dayton.

Screaming matches broke out just steps away from flowers memorializing the nine people who were killed by a lone gunman Sunday.

Police, occupied by the president’s visit to a nearby hospital, were initially not at the scene.

Before officers arrived to calm the melee, City Commissioner Chris Shaw tried to de-escalate the conflict on his own by standing between the two groups.

Republican Congressman Mike Turner is backing restrictions on sales of military style weapons in the wake of the deadly mass shooting in Dayton. 

He'll also support magazine capacity limits and red flag laws that bar potentially dangerous individuals from owning guns.

The jumble of shoes abandoned by people fleeing for their lives early Sunday morning has been removed from the parking lot of Ned Pepper’s bar. Near the front door, flowers and candles are piling up. Heart-shaped wreaths honoring the victims stand a few feet away.

The Dayton community is in mourning after 9 people were killed and over 30 injured in Sunday’s mass shooting.

Fifth street is typically empty on Mondays because most businesses are closed. But today,  reporters from all over the country pace on the sidewalks. TV news trucks hum on both sides of the street.

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