April Laissle | WOSU Radio

April Laissle

April Laissle is a graduate of Ohio University and comes to WYSO from WOUB Public Media in Athens, Ohio where she worked as a weekend host and reporter.  There, she reported on everything from food insecurity to 4-H chicken competitions. April interned at KQED Public Radio in San Francisco, where she focused on health reporting. She also worked on The Broad Experience, a New-York based podcast about women and workplace issues. In her spare time, April loves traveling, trying new recipes and binge-listening to podcasts. April is a Florida native and has been adjusting to Ohio weather since 2011.

Wright State is projecting another drop in student enrollment this fall. The decline is expected to result in a steep tuition revenue loss.

Hundreds of Montgomery County Children’s Services workers walked off the job Friday morning after negotiations with the county failed. But before noon, members were abruptly forced to abandon the picket lines due to a court order has temporarily halting the strike.

Dayton Public Schools will avoid state takeover this year, under the state budget agreement sent to Governor Mike DeWine. 

The deal puts a temporary moratorium on the creation of new Academic Distress Commissions (ADC), the state-appointed groups that step in when school districts repeatedly receive failing grades.

An ADC would have stepped in at DPS this fall if its scores didn’t improve. With the approval of the state budget, the district will avoid that fate for at least for one year.

Dayton Public Schools Vice President Jocelyn Rhynard says she’s relieved.

Montgomery County Children’s Services workers will strike this week, unless a deal is reached before then. The dispute between the 270 member union and the county centers on wages.

Efforts to convince Dayton health systems to sign a state-mandated patient transfer agreement with the Miami Valley’s last abortion clinic remain unsuccessful, despite increased pressure from some politicians, and an ongoing petition campaign.

Clinic officials say without such an agreement, the facility may close.

The office of the Ohio Inspector General (OIG) has found evidence of wrongdoing by a non-profit associated with Wright State University. The investigation released Tuesday centers on Double Bowler, the real estate management company established by Wright State in 2014.

Thousands of trees were downed during a massive outbreak of tornadoes on Memorial Day. In the weeks since, cities have struggled to figure out where to put all that debris. In Greene County, much of it sits at Cemex Reserve in Faiborn, a public wetland park off Garland Avenue. Some residents say they're worried the giant pile of debris may be impacting the environment.


The 10 Ohio counties impacted by the Memorial Day tornado outbreak are now eligible for federal disaster recovery aid. Dayton-area officials say the FEMA and other funding could play a crucial role in the Miami Valley’s ongoing recovery.

President Donald Trump issued a federal disaster declaration Tuesday, one week after Gov. Mike DeWine formally requested it.

The declaration means affected Ohioans are now eligible for aid through FEMA’s individual assistance, hazard mitigation, and disaster legal services programs.

Montgomery County officials say the City of Dayton may be in breach of their water service contract, and it’s asking state regulators to mediate the dispute.

In a letter to the Ohio EPA, the county alleges the city hasn’t been open about its management of PFAS contamination in the water supply. Low levels of the man-made chemical have been found in Dayton’s water.

Montgomery County Director of Environmental Services Patrick Turnbull says while the water supply is safe, they need more information about the extent of the contamination.

Tenants of the storm damaged Kelly Avenue apartments in Old North Dayton were ordered Tuesday to vacate their homes by the end of the week. The news panicked residents, many of whom have nowhere else to go.

More than two weeks after the Memorial Day tornadoes, the Red Cross is meeting individually with displaced people to assess their needs.

Officials say the goal is to make the recovery process less overwhelming for affected families.

Miami Valley officials are only beginning to calculate the longterm impacts of the devastation from last week’s tornado outbreak. Key is an investigation by FEMA to determine whether Ohio is eligible for emergency aid.

Officials caution it’s a complicated process that will take time. To see it in action, WYSO’s April Laissle followed one FEMA team into a particularly hard-hit area of Trotwood.

At the Westbrook Village Apartment Complex, a group of FEMA investigators walk through muddy grass holding clipboards, taking stock of what’s left.

Donations have been pouring into local charities following Memorial Day's devastating tornado outbreak.

In one week, donors have given over $200,000 to the Greater Dayton Disaster Relief Fund, established by the Dayton Foundation. Some donations have come from as far as Japan. The foundation has already awarded some of this money to nonprofits providing aid directly to those affected, including the Foodbank of Dayton. Barbra Stonerock, with the Dayton Foundation, says they choose their grantees carefully.

Over the weekend, thousands of volunteers helped clean-up Dayton neighborhoods damaged by Memorial Day’s tornado outbreak.

Roadways once closed due to storm debris reopened in much of the city over the weekend. Power has been restored to all but about 2,000 residents.  Hundreds remain without gas service.

Dozens of buildings are no longer habitable, including at least two apartment complexes. Some affected residents are staying with friends or family members. About 130 people have moved into emergency shelters.

Inspectors from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are expected to arrive in the Miami Valley next week to begin surveying damage from Monday's tornado outbreak. Dayton city officials say the FEMA inspectors will not be distributing financial assistance during their visit.

Gov. Mike DeWine  requested help earlier this week from FEMA for the 10 counties that suffered tornado damage, including Montgomery, Greene, and Mercer Counties, as the National Weather Service's analysis of the tornadoes and their impact Memorial Day continues to evolve.

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