Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Gov. Mike DeWine gets a coronavirus test during his briefing on June 23, 2020.
Office of Gov. Mike DeWine

Gov. Mike DeWine says it is imperative for the state to ward off a spike of COVID-19 cases as the economy begins to reopen. He says one way of accomplishing that is to increase coronavirus testing.

Evening building supervisor Randy Allen sweeps the hallways at Orange High School, Thursday, March 12, 2020, in Pepper Pike.
Tony Dejak / AP

Most K-12 schools say they plan to restart in-person learning in two months, but much still remains in the air. A coalition of school administrators and teachers say they're waiting on a slew of decisions from Gov. Mike DeWine and the Ohio Department of Education ranging from funding to operations.

prescription medicine pills spilling out of a bottle
Adam / Wikipedia

The FDA has revoked permission for hydroxychloroquine to be used as a treatment for COVID-19, after the drug was publicly touted by President Donald Trump. That leaves the state of Ohio with a stockpile of millions of pills.

Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) says the state as a whole has seen a steady trend in decreasing cases of COVID-19, but he’s warning of possible trouble in southwest Ohio which is not following that trend.

Ohio House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes (D-Akron)
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

The leader of Ohio House Democrats has criticized a slate of proposed police reforms announced by Gov. Mike DeWine this week, saying that they don't get to the root problem of policing.

As doctors around the country have expressed concerns that people are avoiding hospitals due to the pandemic, Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) is urging Ohioans to continue seeking care for other ailments outside of the coronavirus. 

Republican Sen. Steve Huffman speaks during a rally at Darke County GOP headquarters in Greenville, Ohio in this October 13, 2014 file photo.
Al Behrman / AP

The Republican leader of the Ohio Senate, Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina), has issued a rebuke to racist comments made by state Sen. Steve Huffman (R-Tipp City) during a committee hearing last week.

pride flag
Karen Desuyo / Flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled in favor of anti-discrimination protections for LGTBQ people in the workplace. Advocates in Ohio are celebrating the decision but say there's still more work to be done on the state level.

A protester holds up a sign saying "Defund the police" on June 6, 2020, in New York.
Ragan Clark / Associated Press

The recent protests over the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and other Black people killed by police are ramping into a policy debate over the future of law enforcement. While some leaders push for reforms, other advocates have been urging to defund or abolish police departments entirely.

State lawmakers approved hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funding to help local governments recover from the coronavirus pandemic.

Columbus Police confront protesters at a demonstration downtown on June 2, 2020.
Paige Pfleger / WOSU

Republican leaders in the Ohio House are proposing a list of reforms to the law enforcement system, with changes that include more training, stronger disciplinary measures and possible pay increases for police officers.

The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 have continued to increase at a low rate, but health experts are urging people to still take the virus seriously even as more businesses reopen.

Gov. Mike DeWine is moving forward with plans to create what he says will be more accountability and oversight for law enforcement in Ohio. The moves focus on diversifying police forces and getting departments to meet certain standards.

The Ohio National Guard is returning to the state after being called to Washington, DC to secure demonstrations in the District. However, members of the guard are still in some Ohio cities as protesters continue to demonstrate against the deaths of George Floyd and other black people killed by police.

Gov. Mike DeWine announced the reopening plans for larger entertainment venues beginning in two weeks.

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