Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

The Ohio lawmaker who was arrested for impaired driving and felony drug possession will not be asked to step down from his position as representative. 

Ohio State Reps. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, left, and John Patterson, D-Jefferson, announce their proposed overhaul of Ohio's school funding formula at the Statehouse in Columbus, Monday, March 25, 2019.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

State Reps. Bob Cupp (R-Lima) and John Patterson (D-Jefferson) are traveling around the state to present their new school funding formula proposal to different teachers and school administrators around Ohio.

Rep. Bob Cupp (R-Lima) and Rep. John Patterson (D-Jefferson) are traveling around the state to present their new school funding formula proposal to different teachers and school administrators around Ohio. 

The clock is ticking as Ohio lawmakers only have until Sunday to pass a transportation budget, but they’re jammed in a stalemate over the gas tax increase. 

The Republican Senate president is saying the competing transportation budget proposals are closer than they appear as lawmakers go into the final week of negotiations before the deadline to pass a new budget.

Environmental advocates are speaking out against several recent proposals from President Donald Trump’s administration that would weaken the country’s energy efficiency policies, which includes allowing more energy-burning lightbulbs to sidestep the standards.

The Ohio Senate has approved changes to the transportation budget, taking the originally-proposed gas tax hike from 18-cents a gallon to 6-cents a gallon. 

A group of Democratic and Republican senators want to prohibit the use of restraints, such as shackles or handcuffs, on pregnant inmates once they've reached their third trimester.

Gov. Mike DeWine says he's trying to convey his message to lawmakers that the state is in dire need of more money for construction projects, and that his 18-cent gas tax increase proposal is the way to generate those funds. But the House cut that proposal down to 10.7 cents and Republican Senate leaders say more changes are coming.

David Zalubowski / Associated Press

Republican leaders in the Ohio Senate released their version of the transportation budget bill Tuesday. Their proposal makes dozens of changes to what the Ohio House passed in HB62, although the gas tax increase went untouched for now.

The Ohio House is now streaming more committee hearings online through the purchase and installation of new cameras at the Statehouse. This is part of the new effort to expand transparency in the bill making process. 

Republican Senate leaders released their version of the transportation budget bill, making dozens of changes to what the House passed in HB62, however the gas tax increase went untouched. Sen. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) says it's very likely that will change.

Ohio House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes (D-Akron)
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

As the Ohio House prepares to hold hearings on Gov. Mike DeWine’s proposed operating budget, Democratic members want to make sure their priorities are considered.

David Zalubowski / Associated Press

Republican leaders in the Ohio Senate have hinted at some possible changes to the transportation budget plan that could spark a debate among the Senate, House and governor's office.

Republican leaders in the Ohio Senate have hinted at some possible changes to the transportation budget plan that could spark a debate among the Senate, House, and governor's office.

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