Andy Chow | WOSU Radio

Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

The Ohio Attorney General's office has crafted a proposal that would put guardrails around potential opioid lawsuit settlement money to make sure the funds are used specifically for the opioid epidemic.

General Motors announced a joint venture with LG Chem, a subsidiary of LG Corporation, to create a new manufacturing plant in Lordstown to build high-performing batteries for its fleet of electric vehicles.

An all-gender restroom is seen at Seattle City Hall Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

An Ohio lawmaker is calling on the state to require more places to have adult changing tables in restrooms.

The GM plant in Lordstown, Ohio, closed in 2019 as part of a massive company restructuring.
Tony Dejak / Associated Press

General Motors announced on Thursday a joint venture with LG Chem, a subsidiary of LG Corporation, to create a new manufacturing plant in Lordstown to build high-performing batteries for its fleet of electric vehicles.

A grocery store that accepts SNAP benefits.
Jonathan Weiss / Shutterstock

The White House is going forward with a rule that will make it harder for Ohioans in low-income counties to get food stamp benefits. The rule eliminates the ability for states to request waivers on work requirements for counties with high unemployment rates.

An Ohio lawmaker is calling on the state to require more places to have adult changing tables in restrooms.

A bill in the Statehouse, HB399, would cut the amount of instruction hours needed to become a professional cosmetologist or barber in Ohio, once again reigniting the debate over licensing requirements.

Katie Groezinger, a cosmetology student, colors hair using a technique known as balayage at The Spa School in Worthington.
Andy Chow / Ohio Public Radio

A bill in the Statehouse is reigniting the contentious debate over licensing requirements for cosmetologists and barbers. The legislation would cut up to 500 hours of instructional time for people trying to get a cosmetology or barbers license

Gov. Mike DeWine says part of the state's effort to keep young people safe must involve improving teenage driving. That's why Ohio is rolling out a new program that can give new drivers more practical training before they even get behind the wheel through a virtual driving assessment.

Secretary of State Frank LaRose’s spokesperson says there was what they call an "unsophisticated and unsuccessful" attempt to insert code to the office's website on election day earlier this month.

Travel officials are predicting this to be one of the busiest Thanksgiving weekends on the roads, so the Ohio Department of Transportation will be suspending many construction projects.

power lines
Pixabay

House Republicans are pushing for a ban on foreign entities from investing in Ohio's critical infrastructure, such as pipelines and power plants. However an economics professor says this can stifle future development.

It can be hard to stay relevant in the ever-changing world of children's entertainment, but Highlights For Children magazine has lasted for generations by sticking to the formula of mixing fun with learning.

As Emily Burkhalter's third grade class at Evening Street Elementary School in Worthington, Ohio, is enjoying a free reading period, a top choice among the students is Highlights.

Lawmakers are preparing to hold more hearings on a bill that makes it easier to use lethal force as self-defense in a threatening situation, but Gov. Mike DeWine is calling on the legislature to prioritize another bill before "Stand Your Ground."

Carl Attard / Pexels

State regulators have denied AEP’s plan to charge ratepayers a fee for what would be the largest solar project in Ohio. The decision came down to whether electric customers needed the power plant in order to justify the additional cost to electric bills.

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