Andrew Meyer

News Director, WKSU

Andrew joined WKSU News in 2014.  He oversees the daily operations of the WKSU news department and its reporters and hosts, coordinates daily coverage, and serves as editor.  His commitment is to help foster reporting that marks the best of what public radio has to offer:  a mix of first-rate journalism with great storytelling. His responsibilities also include long-term strategic planning for news coverage in Northeast Ohio that serves WKSU’s audience via on-air, online, by social media and through emerging technologies.  You can also hear Andrew on-air daily as the local host for Here and Now, Fresh Air, and The World.

Before joining the staff of WKSU, Andrew was previously assistant news director at WBGO-FM in Newark, NJ. Along with his management duties there, he also anchored afternoon drive time news, reported on local and regional stories and hosted a monthly call-in program with then-Newark Mayor Cory Booker, among others. Before he became a full-time staff member at WBGO in 1998, he worked as a freelance reporter/producer in the New York metropolitan area. He was also a stringer for a number of networks including NPR, ABC Radio and AP Radio.

During his career, Andrew has been recognized with a number of awards, including, nationally, from the Public Radio News Directors Inc. (PRNDI) and, in the New Jersey/New York area, from the New Jersey Associated Press Broadcasters Association, the New Jersey Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and others. He served twice as president of the New Jersey Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

Andrew was born in Louisville, KY, and holds the commission of Colonel in the Honorable Order of  Kentucky Colonels. He and his family now live in Hudson.

Ways to Connect

Kent State University men’s basketball coach Rob Senderoff is in the record books -- at least as far as the school is concerned.  He's recorded 150 wins, the most in school history. Sports commentator Terry Pluto joined WKSU’s Andrew Meyer to talk about what this means to the coach, the school and Division I basketball.


Here are the morning headlines for Friday, December 28, 2018:

  • Plain-Dealer announces layoffs
  • OH House Republicans pick next speaker
  • Abortion measure falls one vote short of veto override
  • Solon attorney named to Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court
  • Fiona the hippo passes symbolic milestone
  • Ravens must get past Browns this weekend to get to playoffs
  • James named AP Male Athlete of the Year, again

Plain-Dealer announces layoffs

Akron’s Innerbelt never lived up to its potential. It never even came close. The highway was supposed to give Akron’s suburbs easy access to downtown, but the road was never completed as intended. The bigger problem is that entire neighborhoods were bulldozed to make way for the highway.

Some of that history and the voices of a few of those who were affected are the focus of a story in the new issue of The Devil Strip:  "A Road to Nowhere: How the Construction of the Innerbelt Displaced Thousands" by Noor Hindi.


Here are your morning headlines for Monday, October 29:

  • Cavs coach Tyronn Lue is out;
  • Judge gives one trial to man accused of killing nine people in Akron;
  • Sen. Lindsey Graham to campaign for GOP in Ohio;
  • Lowellville to remove Mahoning River dam;
  • Man uses pepper spray on officers, police dog in Cleveland;
  • Browns drop the ball with third-straight loss;
  • Johnny Manziel finds success in Canadian Football League;

Cavs coach Tyronn Lue is out

Here are your morning headlines for Thursday, October 18:

  • Ohio officials suspect polio-like disease in two Ohio cases;
  • Report finds an increase in visitors in NE Ohio;
  • Springfield investigates alleged simulated rape scenes at haunted house;
  • Foundation files lawsuit against ruling that workers aren't to contribute to unions;
  • Investigation dismisses Cleveland Indians complaint;
  • Mayfield says recent Browns loss is the worst of his career;

Ohio officials suspect polio-like disease in two Ohio cases

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Nationally, this year may be shaping up to be a watershed moment for women running for elected office. The Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University reported 234 women won House nominations in primaries around the country this year, up from 167 women two years ago.

But how does Ohio measure up?

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, October 17:

Nationally, this year may be shaping up to be a watershed moment for women running for elected office. The Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University reported 234 women won House nominations in primaries around the country this year, up from 167 women two years ago. But how does Ohio measure up?

Here are your morning headlines for Tuesday, October 16:

With about a month remaining before this year's election, talks of "blue waves" have been circulating national political coverage. Here in Ohio, most of the focus has been on the race for governor between Democrat Rich Cordray and Republican Mike DeWine. But many other state races will determine the makeup of the Ohio House and Senate, which is heavily Republican right now.


David Pepper, Ohio Democratic Party Chairman, with the party's statewide candidates
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Now that we're past Labor Day, political campaigns are intensifying. It's the time when voters are more likely to pay attention to the choices they will be making in November.

One of the most notable parts of this year’s election is the number of Democratic and Republican women who are seeking public office, specifically seats in Congress. The Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University reported 234 women won House nominations in primaries around the country this year. That is up from a record 167 women two years ago.

Here are your morning headlines for Wednesday, September 12:

  • University of Akron reports sharp decrease in enrollment; 
  • Groundbreaking for Akron Main Street project;
  • Akron's West Point announces closing date;
  • Ohio to announce winners of global technology challenge;
  • Former OSU workers report odd behavior of deceased wrestling coach;

University of Akron reports sharp decrease in enrollment

The Labor Day weekend is traditionally considered the true start of campaign season. Now that we're past that, the campaigns are intensifying.  It's the time when voters are more likely to pay attention to the choices they will be making in November.

One person who keeps tabs on what’s going on year-round in the world of politics is longtime political watcher and political reporter for WVXU in Cincinnati Howard Wilkinson.

Attorney General

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