Afi Scruggs

Ways to Connect

More than one million Ohio voters have already sent in applications to vote by mail. But the Secretary of State and the Democrats are in court over whether they can be submitted electronically.

On Friday, Ohio’s 10th Court of Appeals blocked a ruling requiring the state to accept emailed and faxed absentee ballot applications. Earlier that day, a Franklin County judge said state law didn’t specifically prohibit online submissions. Presently, applications must be delivered or mailed.

African American healthcare activist Yvonka Hall poses for a portrait in her Lee-Harvard neighborhood of Cleveland, OH.
Marvin Fong / Eye On Ohio

After moving to allow testing of asymptomatic people from ethnic minority groups disproportionately affected by COVID-19, the CDC this week removed all mentions of race and ethnicity from its testing guidelines.

View of the Cuyahoga County Juvenile Justice Center, which also houses an antenna to support local internet coverage.
Eye On Ohio / Ohio Center For Investigative Juornalism

Computer trainer and former library aide Shenee King has a bird’s eye view when it comes to digital inequity.

Ohio’s childcare workers rank among the state’s most economically vulnerable employees, according to a factsheet released Friday by Groundwork Ohio, which lobbies for childcare workers. 

The profession employs more than 53,000, and most are women. Half of those workers rely on some kind of public assistance.

That’s because wages are rock bottom: the average Ohio childcare worker makes roughly $20,000 a year – even though they are likely to have credentials beyond a diploma.

The state's average wage is $54,000 annually.

Oberlin College announced Tuesday it is appealing a judgment of $31 million in damages awarded to Gibson’s Bakery earlier this year.

The appeal is “grounded in the board’s fiduciary responsibility to the College’s long-term financial health,” said the chairman of the school’s board of trustees, Chris Canavan, in a press release.

In the appeal, Oberlin claims students were exercising their First Amendment rights and the college worked to make sure protests were peaceful. 

The Cuyahoga County prosecutor’s office plans to use open source genealogical databases to help identify “stranger rapists” — people who’ve been indicted as John Does for sexual assault but haven’t been identified.

The prosecutor’s office indicts the DNA profile collected from a rape kit to ensure the statute of limitations doesn’t expire. 

There are more than 130 open rape cases in Cuyahoga County and prosecutors plan to start tackling them by trying to identify the assailants with help from DNA-based genealogy databases, said Special Investigations Chief Rick Bell.