Politics & Government

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Updated at 1:26 p.m. ET

President Trump issued an eyebrow-raising tweet Friday morning.

"I am being investigated for firing the FBI Director by the man who told me to fire the FBI Director! Witch Hunt," he wrote.

Trump's tweet comes less than a day after a strange statement from a senior official in his administration.

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In most American cities these days, it seems like there's a Chinese restaurant on every other street corner.

But in the late 1800s, that ubiquity was exactly what certain white establishment figures feared, according to a new study co-written by Gabriel "Jack" Chin, a law professor at the University of California, Davis.

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Cubans really thought that their long era of economic isolation from the United States was over.

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House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., remains hospitalized after multiple surgeries in the wake of Wednesday's shooting in Alexandria, Va., during a morning baseball practice for Republican members of Congress.

Scalise joins a long list of members of Congress shot while in office:

Before James Hodgkinson left his home in Belleville, Ill., in March, he sold nearly everything he owned from his businesses. He told his wife that he was headed to Washington, D.C., "to work on taxes."

Yesterday morning, police say, Hodgkinson fired dozens of bullets at a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Va., wounding five, including House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. Capitol Police officers returned fire, and Hodgkinson was fatally wounded.

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Now we're going to take a closer look at obstruction of justice and what it means if a sitting U.S. president is accused. Ryan Goodman is a professor of law at New York University and he joins us on the line from our New York bureau. Hi there.

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The real estate company run by the family of Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and adviser, has dropped its quest for a major tax break for a skyscraper project in New Jersey.

The Kushner Companies had been seeking a 30-year tax abatement for One Journal Square, a proposed $821 million luxury residential development in Jersey City, N.J.

Last week, the project's developer informed Mayor Steve Fulop that it will no longer seek that tax abatement, a spokeswoman for Jersey City confirmed Thursday.

Updated at 1 a.m. Friday ET

The sun danced and dipped through a bright blue sky over Nationals Park Thursday night, leaving a warm still evening in its wake.

"What a beautiful day for baseball," blared a voice over the loudspeakers, after Bruce Springsteen's "Glory Days" faded out, and John Fogerty's "Centerfield" finished, too.

Former Vice President Joe Biden has figured something out: "I learned how to become one of the most popular politicians in America," he says. "Announce that you are not running for president, and be authentic."

Biden shared that secret with Fresh Air on Tuesday in front of a live audience at WHYY studios in Philadelphia, where he received WHYY's Lifelong Learning Award for his distinguished career in public service and commitment to education.

The Wednesday shooting at a Virginia baseball field that critically wounded Louisiana GOP Rep. Steve Scalise and at least four others shook Washington.

Members of Congress were breaking into tears talking about the event.

But the violent outburst, while shocking and distressing, was not a complete surprise; threats and aggression toward members of Congress have gotten a lot of press in recent months, notably at town hall-style events. And especially related to the health care debate.

"What's the difference between the FBI director and Mr. Snowden?" Russian President Vladimir Putin asked Thursday during his yearly live call-in show, saying that he would offer political asylum to fired FBI head James Comey in the same way Russia has sheltered former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

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In 1974, McDonald's set its sights on opening a new franchise in Manhattan's Upper East Side at the corner of Lexington Avenue and 66th Street. This location wouldn't be anything like the ketchup and mustard colored buildings in the suburbs. It would be tasteful and blend in with the townhouses surrounding it. Regardless of aesthetics, Upper East Siders were having none of it.

What does it mean to make a bill less "mean"? This week, President Trump told Senate Republicans to do just that to their health care overhaul bill, and to also make it "more generous," as sources told the Associated Press. But it appears the White House didn't give much more direction: "the president did not say what aspects of the bill he was characterizing," the AP also reported.

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A special counsel's curiosity now reportedly extends to the actions of President Trump.

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says he wants flexibility as he tries to improve ties with Russia. U.S. lawmakers, however, are going in another direction.

The Senate has overwhelmingly passed a bill to impose new sanctions on Russia and to make sure the Trump administration doesn't change course without congressional buy-in.

"The Case of the Bloviating Bloggers."

That might be an apt title for the mini-drama that took place Wednesday when two judicial nominees came before the Senate Judiciary Committee, among the first batch President Trump has sent to the Senate for confirmation.

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Our next guest is Congressman Dave Schweikert in our studios once again. He's a Republican from Arizona. Congressman, thanks for coming by this morning.

DAVE SCHWEIKERT: Oh, happy to.

INSKEEP: Got your cup of coffee, ready to talk here.

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