Politics & Government

The Democrats' Direction

Aug 19, 2018

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Steve Bannon Returns With New Film

Aug 19, 2018

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Steve Bannon has been mostly out of the picture since being fired by President Trump more than a year ago. But now he's back, and he has a new film.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TRUMP @ WAR")

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Like their counterparts across the country, Wisconsin Democrats eager to win back the House and make gains in the Senate have been watching primary election voter turnout with bated breath. This week, they found reason to be hopeful: turnout in the state's primary on Tuesday soared to its highest level since 2002, with a surge in Democratic votes.

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Editor's note: Parts of this story contain content that is sexually explicit.

Twenty years ago Friday, the long-running independent counsel Whitewater investigation had reached a crossroads, far from where it started, with prosecutors questioning President Bill Clinton about his relationship with a former White House intern, Monica Lewinsky.

This week in the Russia investigations: President Trump strikes back at one of his most politically dangerous critics. Will a short-term victory have longer-term costs?

The revocation, Part 1

President Trump made good on his threat to revoke the security clearance held by former CIA Director John Brennan this week, escalating the politics of the Russia imbroglio in an important way.

Trump, whether or not this was his intention, has demoted Brennan from what lawyers might call a "fact witness" to a simple critic.

The release of a massive grand jury report into sexual abuse in six Roman Catholic dioceses in Pennsylvania is posing a challenge for priests who will address the report to their parishioners this weekend. The roughly 900-page report includes horrid reports of of "predator priests" that conducted "criminal and/or morally reprehensible conduct" — often covered up for decades.

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