Politics & Government

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Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court essentially punted on extreme partisan gerrymandering Monday, declining to address the central questions at the heart of whether the practice is constitutional.

The court took up two cases, one out of Wisconsin and one out of Maryland, with lines drawn by both parties.

It declared that the plaintiffs in Wisconsin don't have standing to sue, because they didn't try to prove that their vote had been diluted in their own district.

Updated at 12:35 p.m. ET

"We do not have a policy of separating families at the border. Period," Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen says, as top Trump administration officials call out critics of its "zero tolerance" policy that calls for separating families who cross the border illegally.

Mike DeWine and Richard Cordray
AP Photos

It turns out Ohio's rollercoaster primary season was just as tumultuous under the hood as it was on the surface, as personal loans drove one Republican campaign's spending above $14 million and an eager Democrat spent himself into the hole.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Democrats are saying thousands of voters could be affected by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision upholding the way Ohio deletes inactive registrations. But Secretary of State Jon Husted, who’s also the Republican candidate for lieutenant governor, says the law prevents voters from being removed before the fall election.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When Congress approved giving $380 million to states to bolster the security of their elections, state officials were caught off guard but extremely grateful. Elections are notoriously underfunded and haven't seen a windfall like this from the federal government in more than a decade.

But getting that money out to all the states, and then into the hands of localities that run the elections, with enough time to have a meaningful effect on the 2018 midterm elections is a difficult proposition.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When World War II ended in August 1945, President Harry Truman was a man in a hurry.

In the final few months of that year, he pushed hard to help establish the United Nations to handle international political disputes, and the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund to deal with the shattered global economy.

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