Environment

A coalition of 17 states and the District of Columbia, led by California, is suing the Environmental Protection Agency over its plan to change vehicle efficiency standards. The states are asking a court to review the EPA's proposed actions, arguing that they violate the Clean Air Act.

"We're not looking to pick a fight with the Trump administration, but when the stakes are this high for our families' health and our economic prosperity, we have a responsibility to do what is necessary to defend them," California's attorney general, Xavier Becerra, said.

Nick Evans / WOSU

Bret Ruby trudges up a slight rise at the Hopeton Earthworks, one of six sites that make up the Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Ruby serves as Hopewell’s archaeologist, and he wears the dark green uniform and flat brimmed hat of the National Park Service.

Even now, 10 years later, park ranger Andrea Moore remembers the familiar smell in the air that told her it was going to be a good hunt — a damp, sweet smell. It was a mix of rotting bark with an undercurrent of rebirth as trees begin to grow new leaves, while dead ones still litter the terrain.

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, has proposed a new rule that restricts scientific research that can be used by the agency for its regulatory decisions.

The proposed rule only allows the use of studies that make all data publicly available for anyone to analyze. Pruitt proposed the new rule as a way to make the agency's decision-making more "transparent, objective and measurable."

Aerial Associates Photography, Inc. by Zachary Haslick / NOAA

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is asking for broad public input on its plan to have the open waters of western Lake Erie declared impaired under the federal Clean Water Act.  And a leading group opposed to the state agency’s decision is encouraging its supporters to offer feedback, too.

Erik Drost / Flickr

Research into Lake Erie's toxic algae shows no clear decrease in the pollutants feeding the persistent blooms during the past five years, according to an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency report.

Roger C / Flickr

Environmentalists are praising the U.S. Senate for blocking a measure loosening shipping regulations on the Great Lakes – and making it easier for invasive species to foul those waters.

The spring thaw is upon us, and parched western states will be watching closely as snows melt and rivers rise. Fancy satellites monitor water levels in the biggest rivers, but they don't spot the smaller streams and waterways that feed into them. Now, some Colorado scientists have hit on a new way of tracking those smaller streams — inspired, by Pokemon.

Ohio has a legislative caucus working to raise awareness of the state’s trails. 

The caucus, formed last year, is the only one in the U.S. dedicated to trails.  The group of lawmakers has been working with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to create a website with an interactive guide to the thousands of miles of state trails.

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