Environment

A solar farm in Shelby, Ohio.
Thomas R Machnitzki

Clean energy issues have been a spark plug for debate at the Ohio Statehouse for years now, with opposition mostly coming from Republicans and Democrats supporting incentives for the industry. A clean energy group has new data that they say can change the debate during campaign season.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

Nearly all of the seats on the U.S. National Park Service advisory board are vacant following a mass resignation Monday night, with ex-members citing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's unwillingness to meet with them.

Jerry Horton / Cleveland State University

Marion Motley Playfields is a park on Cleveland’s east side. Named for a local pro football star, it has grassy fields, baseball diamonds and hills.

Flickr

Some Ohio State University researchers are starting a three-year study looking for keys to predicting, mitigating, controlling, or even preventing harmful algal blooms in rivers and streams all over the country. 

Amy Nichole Harris / Shutterstock

A new year brings new opportunities for recreation and commercial interests along the Great Lakes. It also means seven gubernatorial elections in states that border the lakes, and growing concern over climate change.

workers move a section of well casing into place at a Chesapeake Energy natural gas well site near Burlington, Pa., in Bradford County.
Ralph Wilson / AP

The Trump administration decided quietly over the holidays to abandon proposed federal regulations governing fracking on public lands. For Ohio environmentalists, the decision is big and bad news. However, the state's oil and gas industry sees it as a practical approach to regulation.

Ohio Among States Named In Pollution Control Lawsuit

Jan 2, 2018

A group of northeast states is taking issue with industrial pollution drifting in from the south and Midwest. New York and seven others are suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to have Ohio and eight other states added to the so-called Ozone Transport Region. 

The Trump administration says it will no longer criminally prosecute companies that accidentally kill migratory birds. The decision reverses a rule made in the last weeks of the Obama administration.

A legal memo from the Department of the Interior posted Friday declares that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act applies only to purposeful actions that kill migratory birds, and not to energy companies and other businesses that kill birds incidentally.

The federal tax overhaul Congress passed earlier this month amassed a lot of attention and what it would do as far as tax breaks and increases. But a provision was slipped into the large piece of legislation that has many environmental advocates concerned. 

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