Environment

Steve Brown

At the U.S. Forest Service’s Northern Research Station near Delaware State Park, Jennifer Koch guides an off-road vehicle down a winding path that opens to a large, fenced-in area of young trees.

But not just any trees: Koch and other researchers with the Forest Service hope this plot could hold one of the keys to the survival of the ash tree in North America.

The EPA & Climate Change Denial

May 22, 2018
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, has been trying for over a year to roll back multiple Obama-era policies including the storage of toxic waste produced by power plants. Many of his proposals have been met with litigation and lawsuits that have stalled the process. 

Today, we consider the steps Scott Pruitt has taken to change environmental policy as well as the role climate change denial has in the United States.

If Scott Pruitt arrived on Capitol Hill expecting to be grilled Wednesday, he did not have to wait long to see that expectation fulfilled.

It’s a special time of year for migratory birds.

Tired from their travels, they stop right on the coast of western Lake Erie and spend some time resting and refueling with some food – primarily insects. Nine years ago, Ohio non-profit Black Swamp Bird Observatory decided to capitalize on this event, drawing in thousands of birders from all 50 states, 52 countries, and 6 continents over the years.

Allegheny Front

After 40 years, Kerri and Jeff Bond are moving from their small farm in Seneca Lake, Ohio. The rural hillsides have changed in recent years. The trees in their yard started to lose foliage and die last year. Their sheep, chickens and cats died, and their dogs developed tumors.

A coalition of 17 states and the District of Columbia, led by California, is suing the Environmental Protection Agency over its plan to change vehicle efficiency standards. The states are asking a court to review the EPA's proposed actions, arguing that they violate the Clean Air Act.

"We're not looking to pick a fight with the Trump administration, but when the stakes are this high for our families' health and our economic prosperity, we have a responsibility to do what is necessary to defend them," California's attorney general, Xavier Becerra, said.

Nick Evans / WOSU

Bret Ruby trudges up a slight rise at the Hopeton Earthworks, one of six sites that make up the Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. Ruby serves as Hopewell’s archaeologist, and he wears the dark green uniform and flat brimmed hat of the National Park Service.

Even now, 10 years later, park ranger Andrea Moore remembers the familiar smell in the air that told her it was going to be a good hunt — a damp, sweet smell. It was a mix of rotting bark with an undercurrent of rebirth as trees begin to grow new leaves, while dead ones still litter the terrain.

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