Education

ECOT statehouse rally
Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

Ohio had authority to calculate a giant online charter school's funding using student participation data rather than only enrollment, the state Supreme Court ruled Wednesday in the latest blow to the now-dismantled e-school.

Editor's note on Aug. 8, 2018: This piece has been substantially updated from a version published in 2014.

A solemn little boy with a bowl haircut is telling Mr. Rogers that his pet got hit by a car. More precisely, he's confiding this to Daniel Striped Tiger, the hand puppet that, Rogers' wife, Joanne, says, "pretty much was Fred."

For Many College Students, Hunger 'Makes It Hard To Focus'

Jul 31, 2018

As students enter college this fall, many will hunger for more than knowledge. Up to half of college students in recent published studies say they either are not getting enough to eat or are worried about it.

Columbus State student Patrick Simmons uses the new Blindspot app to navigate around the Columbus State campus.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

New navigation technology made possible by the state is helping blind students at Columbus State Community College get around the campus easier.

Kabir Bhatia / WKSU

Monday is the first day of school for about 240 Akron students who are attending the “I Promise School,” an experimental public school backed by Akron native LeBron James.

Greg Moody, a top aide for Gov. John Kasich during his fight to keep Medicaid expansion, is stepping down from his post in the Office of Health Transformation.
Andrew Welsh-Huggins / AP

One of Gov. John Kasich’s top department chiefs has resigned.

Legal Marijuana Oregon
Gosia Wozniacka / Associated Press

Amid delays in the state's medical marijuana program, Cleveland School of Cannabis is holding an open house in Columbus on Friday for people interested in working in the industry. 

children with crayons
Pixabay

A new report shows low income Ohio children are not getting enough early intervention to be successful in school and life.

Esperanza Yanez can spot a sick cow just by looking at it.

"The head hangs down and they don't eat," says Yanez, who immigrated from Mexico two decades ago and has been caring for cattle ever since.

While learning to communicate with animals takes years of patience, Yanez says the true language barrier exists between the dairy workers and the veterinarians who rarely speak Spanish. Medical terminology can be confusing, and to avoid embarrassment, Yanez says she and other workers may feign comprehension.

Liberty Local Schools / Facebook

Of the 600-plus public school districts in Ohio, more than three-quarters have open enrollment policies. That means they accept and educate students who live outside of their district boundaries.

Fake news. Record-low voting turnout. Frequent and false claims from elected officials. Vitriol in many corners of political debate.

These are symptoms we hear of all the time that our democracy is not so healthy.

And those factors might be why many states are turning to the traditional — and obvious — place where people learn how government is supposed to work: schools. More than half of the states in their last legislative sessions — 27 to be exact — have considered bills or other proposals to expand the teaching of civics.

Trump administration lawyers are defending their new rules on how campuses should handle cases of sexual assault. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos issued the new guidance last fall after scrapping Obama-era rules that she said were forcing schools to violate the due process rights of the accused. Survivors' advocates filed a federal lawsuit shortly after, arguing DeVos' replacement guidelines discriminate against accusers and discourage them from reporting assaults.

Rachael McRae, a fifth-grade teacher in central Illinois, was sitting on the couch the other day with her 4-month-old when she saw the email.

"He was having a fussy day," she says, "so I was bouncing him in one arm, and started going through my emails on my phone, just to feel like I was getting something done." In her spam folder, she found an email from an organization called My Pay, My Say, urging her to drop her union membership.

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