Education

A Degree With Zero Student Debt. Does It Work?

May 28, 2018

Justin Napier is exactly the kind of community college graduate Tennessee was hoping for.

In high school, Napier didn't have his eye on college. In fact, he had a job lined up working on race cars after graduation. But in the spring of 2014, a year before Napier graduated, Gov. Bill Haslam announced a plan to make community college free for graduating high school seniors, part of a broader plan to dramatically increase the number of adults in Tennessee with college credentials. It was called, grandly, the Tennessee Promise.

Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

Franklin County’s prosecutor will bring in outside counsel to review evidence related to the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow.

Updated at 1:05 p.m. ET

It's a financial nightmare for public school teachers across the country: Federal grants they received to work in low-income schools were converted to thousands of dollars in loans that they now must pay back.

Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

Republican candidates on this fall’s ballot are moving to distance themselves from the founder of ECOT, after reports of an FBI investigation for illegal campaign contributions and the release of a critical state audit, which could result in criminal charges.

Classroom
wokandapix / Pixabay

State Board of Education members will vote this week on whether to ask for a delay in the implementation of the final phase of the state’s A-F grading system.

At least one Ohio school impacted by the abrupt bankruptcy of Discovery Tours will still be able to take their field trip, thanks to the help of their local community, but the travel company’s closure is affecting students across the state.

The Columbus Board of Education voted Friday to accept more than $20,000 in donations from local education groups, firefighters, police officers and others for students at Ridgeview Middle School.

As high school seniors across Ohio prepare to walk across that stage to collect their diplomas, many have already chosen their next steps after high school, but a number of the state’s higher education institutions are still accepting applications from students who may not have yet decided where they’ll be in the fall.

The National Association for College Admission Counseling reports 26 Ohio colleges and universities still have room for both first-time freshmen and transfer students.

ECOT founder Bill Lager speaks to the crowd of students, parents and teachers earlier this year.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio Auditor Dave Yost says ECOT, once the state’s largest online charter school, committed fraud by inflating student participation numbers in order to continue collecting millions in taxpayer money. Now Yost is turning over his findings about the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow for possible criminal investigation.

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