Education

For only the third time ever, the government released today a national report card examining the knowledge, understanding and abilities of U.S. eighth-graders in visual arts and music.

And in many ways, the numbers aren't great, with little progress shown in most categories since the last time the assessment was given in 2008. One bright spot: The achievement gap between Hispanic students and their white peers has narrowed. But Hispanics and African-Americans still lag far behind white and Asian eighth-graders.

Dennis Kucinich holds his pocket Constitution during a speech at a Columbus church on April 2, 2017.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Former U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich is making a series of appearances across Ohio to describe what he says are the failings of the state's charter school system.

Organizers of Saturday's nationwide March for Science have some pretty lofty goals: supporting science "as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity." Promoting "evidence-based policies in the public interest." Oh, and don't forget highlighting "the very real role that science plays in each of our lives and the need to respect and encourage research that gives us insight into the world."

Whoa, that's a lot of exalted ground to cover with one cardboard sign!

Mariah Evans, a sociology professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, began to notice a trend in her morning classes: Her students were falling asleep.

While this would make most feel discouraged in their teaching abilities or agitated over their students' idleness, Evans instead was curious. Was there more to this than just laziness?

Every day in this country students come to school without a way to pay for lunch. Right now it's up to the school to decide what happens next.

Since new legislation out of New Mexico on so-called lunch shaming made headlines, we've heard a lot about how schools react.

Google Creative Commons

Ohio’s high school juniors may head into their summer break uncertain about what they need to do to earn a high school diploma. At the moment, they must reach a certain score on seven end of course tests. But that is likely to change.

Robbinsville High School sits in a small gap in the Smoky Mountains of North Carolina. Green slopes dotted with cattle hug in around the school before they rise into a thick cover of pine trees.

David Matheson is the principal here. And he's the only high school principal in the state who still performs corporal punishment. At Robbinsville, corporal punishment takes the form of paddling - a few licks on the backside Matheson delivers with a long wooden paddle.

High schools around the state are facing a crucial dilemma as about a third of students are not on track to graduate. That’s based on the new graduation standards that begin with the class of 2018. Now leaders are moving quickly to find a way to remedy the approaching crisis.

Google Creative Commons

The Class of 2018 in Ohio’s high schools will be the first to choose their route to graduation – pass some state tests, take a college entrance exam or earn an industry credential.

But new numbers show as much as a third of those students won’t be able to get their diplomas when those new graduation standards take effect next year. That has the state’s education leaders scrambling to make changes.

How important is it to have a role model?

A new working paper puts some numbers to that question.

Having just one black teacher in third, fourth or fifth grade reduced low-income black boys' probability of dropping out of high school by 39 percent, the study found.

And by high school, African-American students, both boys and girls, who had one African-American teacher had much stronger expectations of going to college. Keep in mind, this effect was observed seven to ten years after the experience of having just one black teacher.

President Trump's updated executive order, the one restricting travel from six Muslim-majority countries, is blocked for now.

But administrators at Northeastern University in Boston aren't taking any chances.

"We're in a state of limbo," says Mike Armini, who oversees government relations. "We don't quite know what's going to happen next, so we've advised them to stay here," he says, talking about the 250 Northeastern students from those six countries.

desks in a classroom
Flickr / Creative Commons

For all the talk about local control of schools, a great deal of education policy comes from the state. And that includes the appraisal of teachers. Most K-12 instructors in Ohio are graded and classified according to the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System. That assessment has changed several times since it was written in 2011.

The McCracken Power Plant on Ohio State's campus.
Michael Barera / Wikimedia Commons

Ohio State University says it’s moving forward with a plan to privatize its energy production.

Seventeen-year-old Indrani Das just won the top high school science prize in the country. Das, who lives in Oradell, N.J., took home $250,000 from the former Intel Science Talent Search, now the Regeneron Science Talent Search, for her study of brain injuries and neuron damage. In her spare time, she's already working with patients as a certified EMT.

Muslim children are more likely to be bullied in school than children of other faiths. A new survey by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU) reveals that 42 percent of Muslims with children in K–12 schools report bullying of their children because of their faith, compared with 23 percent of Jewish and 20 percent of Protestant parents.

These results confirm recent findings by other research and advocacy groups showing that bullying of students of color is on the rise.

school desk
Flickr Creative Commons

According to state report cards, Columbus ranks at the top of large school districts for chronic absenteeism, with a rate of 38.1 percent. And education advocates say that can have a rippling effects for students.

Christian Times Newspaper

You’ve probably read some of the stories. Maybe it was the one about thousands of fake ballots being stored in a Columbus warehouse for the 2016 election.  Or one about President Obama signing an executive order to ban the Pledge of Allegiance in schools. They're all fake.

Growing up in a hungry household in the first couple of years of life can hurt how well a child performs in school years later, according to a new study.

An estimated 13.1 million children live in homes with insufficient food, according to the most recent figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Esther Honig

As spring sets in, so does anxiety for many high school seniors touring colleges across the United States - especially those who might not see college as a viable path. At Ohio State, it was exactly those students - from Ohio's cities and rural towns - who took part in the "Day in The Life of a Buckeye" on Wednesday.

School districts must give students with disabilities the chance to make meaningful, "appropriately ambitious" progress, the Supreme Court said Wednesday in an 8-0 ruling.

The decision in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District could have far-reaching implications for the 6.5 million students with disabilities in the United States.

Adora Namigadde

At Bexley High School, the third-best high school in Ohio according to U.S. News & World Report, most juniors were planning to take a college entrance exam if they hadn't already. But for the first time in Ohio, school districts will be required to administer the ACT or SAT test to all students, college bound or not. 

What Do Ohio Students Need to Get to School Every Day?

Mar 19, 2017

The Ohio State Board of Education is working on a model policy to ensure fewer students miss school.

Students who miss a lot school fall behind. It's a national problem.

The IRS Data Retrieval Tool is down.

If those words don't send a shiver up your spine, it means you're not a high school senior or college student rushing to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

The FAFSA is the form — famously complicated and difficult to finish — that stands between many low-income students and the federal, state and institutional aid they need to pay for college.

Pixabay

Ohio high school students may be able to earn a diploma without relying solely on test scores.   A work group assembled to study Ohio’s graduation requirements meets Wednesday to discuss five proposed options. 

Ideastream

The Ohio School Superintendent plans to hold off on submitting the state’s new education plan to the federal government next month. The move comes the same day that the U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced that states would have much more flexibility.

Students meditating
Inner Explorer

A philanthropic foundation is offering to subsidize a “mindfulness” program for some Ohio schools.   The practice of daily meditation is already being used in some schools, and backers say the  simple bit of self-reflection has been improving behavior and test scores.   

Once again, it was another big week for national education news. Here's our quick take on the top stories.

Senate scraps federal regulations

On Thursday, the Senate voted to roll back Obama-era rules that clarified and elaborated on a wide range of accountability requirements in the federal education law known as The Every Student Succeeds Act.

Ohio’s auditor has issued a report that’s critical of the state’s largest online charter school, saying it isn’t tracking the amount of learning time of the 15,000 students it claimed were enrolled last year.

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