Education

ECOT spokesman Neil Clark
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio's largest online charter school is making drastic job cuts to help pay the $60 million it owes the state

Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow spokesman Neil Clark says the cuts are needed to pay back 60 percent of the $100 million the school got from the state last year.

Esther Honig

A few blocks from the Kent State University campus, Ibrahim Albadri shares a small apartment with a roommate and his orange tabby named Zena.

School bus
Flickr / Creative Commons

Both the House and Senate increased the amount the state will spend on its 610 school districts beyond Gov. John Kasich’s original budget proposal. But school leaders are concerned about a big cut that’s remained through all three versions of the budget.

Quinn Dombrowski / Flickr

An overflowing craft beer industry has pushed administrators at an Ohio college to expand their curriculum. Cincinnati State Technical and Community College is now offering the state’s first two-year degree in brewing science.

ECOT founder Bill Lager speaks to the crowd of students, parents and teachers.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The state school board votes on Monday on whether to require the state’s largest online charter school, the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, to pay back $60 million in state funding it got for actually having 60 percent fewer students than it claimed it did.

Phoebe Petrovic / ideastream

Ohio state law prohibits firearms inside school buildings, but school boards have the right to give individuals permission to conceal carry.

At the Faculty/Administrator Safety Training and Emergency Response or FASTER training, educators prepare in case of an active shooter. On the third and last day, participants go through an active shooter simulation.

An educator prepare to enter the shoot house, which is meant to simulate a hallway, doors and corners of a school.
Annie Wu / ideastream

As the school year comes to a close, some Ohio teachers will be spending part of their summer break training for next fall.

They’re preparing in case of an active shooter in their schools. But this time around, teachers aren't learning to barricade doors or counter a shooter with distractions. 

Mexican school student
Sarah Gallo

The Trump administration's crackdown on illegal immigration has divided some families. For the families that remain together, life in Mexico can be hard, especially for children who've never called the country home.

Spencer Campbell spends much of his days walking the halls of Elk Ridge Middle School, checking breezeways for kids playing hooky, redirecting foot traffic between classes and checking on substitute teachers.

Campbell is one of two assistant principals at Elk Ridge, a school just south of Salt Lake City, Utah. It's his first year in the role and he looks the part. He's in his late 30s, sharply dressed, walks briskly and carries a walkie-talkie on his belt.

Pankaj Rayamajhi hears something. Senioritis?

The director of school logistics and operations has a kind of sixth sense about that unique Spring affliction as he roams the hallways of Columbia Heights Education Campus, a public middle and high school in Washington, D.C.

Rayamajhi quickens his pace, walkie-talkie in hand, and turns a corner into a stairwell. Yep, senioritis. When they see him, the small group of students loitering on the stairs scatters back to class.

Which test is best? That’s the debate among state lawmakers as Ohio schools have completely phased out state tests taken with paper and pencil in favor of online testing only. 

dcJohn / Flickr

State auditors say a large north Columbus school that suddenly closed in 2015 still owes the state hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Google Creative Commons

Next year’s graduating high school senior must get a good score over seven different final tests or on a college entrance exam, or earn an industry credential.

As many as 47,000 high school juniors are potentially on track to fail to meet those standards. An amendment that may be attached to the budget in the Senate seeks to help those students.

President Trump's full budget proposal for fiscal year 2018, to be released Tuesday, calls for a $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, spending cut to education. The cuts would be spread across K-12 and aid to higher education, according to documents released by the White House.

None of this can be finalized without Congress. And the political track record for Presidents who want to reduce education funding is not promising, even in a far less poisoned atmosphere than the one that hovers over Washington right now.

Student loans

Karen Kasler

There’s a bill in the state Legislature that’s meant to give local school districts more control over curriculum.

Debbie Holmes

Paying bills. Making friends. Finding a job, housing, or even just food. Aging out of foster care brings a range of challenges for young adults thrust into a new world.

A new program at Capital University is trying to help.

Flickr

New research shows that black girls are punished at a greater disparity than black boys - and that holds true in Central Ohio.

Wright State programs could be cut, and more than 100 employees could be let go under the university's upcoming Fiscal Year 2018 budget proposal. School officials are expected to release details of the plan at a finance committee meeting May 19.

As many as 120 employees could be let go, Wright State officials say.

Jinx/Flickr

The Ohio Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that a student’s constitutional rights weren’t violated by a search of an unattended book bag that led to the discovery of a gun.

Debbie Holmes

After opening in 2013 with the idea of pairing low-income students with local businesses, Cristo Rey Columbus High School in downtown Columbus will graduate its first class of students. And, as the 47 seniors commemorate their four years at Cristo Rey, all of them will celebrate being accepted into college.

Typing on a laptop
Axelle B / Public Domain Pictures

A state hearing officer has ruled against Ohio's largest online charter school in its appeal of the state education department's determination that the school owes $60 million for enrollment that can't be justified.

Read this article if you're having a rough day. This is a rare story about positive social change.

ECOT founder Bill Lager speaks to the crowd of students, parents and teachers.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The battle between the state and its largest online charter school brought supporters of the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, or ECOT, to the Statehouse on Tuesday to show support for the school locked in a fight with the state over tens of millions of dollars.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

May 8, 2017
Ohio Statehouse in Columbus
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine rejected a draft summary creating a bipartisan panel in charge of drawing state congressional district lines. Nationally, House Republicans have passed Trump's new proposed health-care bill, which moves on to the Senate. If approved by the Senate, Ohio schools could loses millions in Medicaid funding dedicated to special education services. 

Today we discuss the new health-care bill, the shutdown of re-drawing congressional districts and the latest in state and national news with a panel of reporters. 

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