Education

Some Wright State students are planning to attend town-hall meeting Wednesday to learn more about how a faculty strike scheduled for January 22 may affect them.

Wright State University is preparing for a planned faculty strike January 22. University administration officials say the school will remain open even if faculty head to the picket line. 

News of the potential walkout is being met with confusion by some Wright State students returning to campus for the start of the new semester.

After the 2016 presidential election, teachers across the country reported they were seeing increased name-calling and bullying in their classrooms. Now, research shows that those stories — at least in one state — are confirmed by student surveys.

The Wright State Faculty union, the American Association of University Professors, has filed a 10-day notice to strike after the university administration issued what it called its “last, best” contract offer on Friday.

The AAUP-WSU union’s move to strike is the culmination of nearly two years of failed negotiations.

The U.S. Department of Education is sending emails to about 15,000 people across the country telling them: You've got money.

Miami University's board of trustees is set Friday to upgrade the school's gaming minor to its own major.

Two students share a laptop in the atrium of the chemistry building at the University of Michigan. One, Cameron Russell, is white, a freshman from a rice-growing parish in Louisiana; the other, Elijah Taylor, is black, a senior and a native of Detroit.

They are different, yes, but there is much that unites them.

For public school teacher Kaitlyn McCollum, even simple acts like washing dishes or taking a shower can fill her with dread.

"It will just hit me like a ton of bricks," McCollum says. " 'Oh my God, I owe all of that money.' And it's, like, a knee-buckling moment of panic all over again."

She and her family recently moved to a much smaller, older house. One big reason for the downsizing: a $24,000 loan that McCollum has been unfairly saddled with because of a paperwork debacle at the U.S. Department of Education.

Columbus City Schools District Office.
Nick Evans

The Columbus City School Board again finds itself one seat short after Mary Jo Hudson announced her resignation. She argues the school board needs a complete restructuring.

A classroom at Cleveland's John Hay High School.
Ashton Marra / Ideastream

An Ohio Senate committee has approved "alternate pathways" to graduation for high school seniors and juniors who are not on track to earn their diploma through the current method of using standardized test scores.

When Maddy Nadeau was a toddler, her mother wasn't able to care for her. "I remember Mom was always locking herself in her room and she didn't take care of me. My mom just wasn't around at the time," she says.

Every day, her older sister Devon came home from elementary school and made sure Maddy had something to eat.

"Devon would come home from school and fix them cold hot dogs or a bowl of cereal — very simple items that both of them could eat," says Sarah Nadeau, who fostered the girls and later adopted them.

School bus
Flickr / Creative Commons

High school seniors not meeting the testing benchmarks to graduate next year could have extra options on the table – that is, if Ohio lawmakers can pass a change before the end of the year. 

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