Crimes & Courts

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided to not hear an argument from an Ohio group that claims the state’s top elections official is wrongfully tossing out ballots. 

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted
Ohio Public Radio

The fight over how Ohio has maintained its voter rolls has made it to the nation’s highest court. 

US Supreme Court
Joe Ravi / Wikimedia commons

The Supreme Court will decide whether Ohio wrongfully purged eligible voters from the state's registration list.

President Trump is moving quickly to put his personal stamp on the federal courts.

On Monday the president nominated 10 people for federal judgeships. Thanks to an unusually large number of vacancies on the bench, there could be many more to come.

"This is just a down payment," said John Malcolm of the Heritage Foundation. He noted there are more than 100 open seats on the federal district courts and appeals courts.

The U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday in a Missouri case with the potential to open grant programs to parochial schools.

Updated at 2:47 p.m. ET

Judge Neil Gorsuch was confirmed Friday as the 113th justice to serve on the nation's highest court. The final vote was 54-45, mostly along party lines.

About two dozen Ohio Republicans who support President Trump's nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court took their message to the Statehouse earlier today.

This is how the Senate changes — not with a bang, but with a motion to overturn the ruling of the chair.

By a simple majority vote, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., set a new precedent in the Senate that will ease the confirmation for President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch on Friday, after 30 more hours of debate on the floor.

"This will be the first, and last, partisan filibuster of a Supreme Court justice," said McConnell in a closing floor speech.

Thursday is the day the judicial filibuster in the Senate is scheduled to die. There hasn't been much of an effort to save it, but there have been a lot of lamentations for the slow demise of the World's Greatest Deliberative Body (WGDB), otherwise known as the U.S. Senate.

Here are five insights into what the death of the judicial filibuster means:

1. The winners and losers

Rob Portman
Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Sen. Rob Portman says he's hopeful Congress will be able to vote this week on Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, without invoking the so-called "nuclear" option—but he'd support it as a last result. 

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