Crimes & Courts

President Trump has vowed not to ask prospective members of the Supreme Court about their views on Roe v. Wade, the basis for legal abortion nationwide since 1973 and the most widely discussed legal case in America in the past half-century.

President Trump also made a rather different promise to voters in 2016 in his third televised debate with Hillary Clinton. He said Roe would be overturned if he got to change the balance on the court:

US Supreme Court
Joe Ravi / Wikimedia commons

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's political podcast from WOSU Public Media, we discuss the Supreme Court's decision on public employee unions and the possible conflicts of interest in the sexual harassment investigation of state Sen. Bill Seitz.

Updated June 29 at 12:28 p.m. ET

The process of replacing retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy is underway, and the prospect of filling the seat held by the court's swing vote is setting the stage for what is likely to be a battle over abortion rights unlike any in a generation.

A classroom at Cleveland's John Hay High School.
Ashton Marra / Ideastream

More than 100,000 Ohio teachers who are members of their local unions could soon feel the impact of a U.S. Supreme Court decision Wednesday.

Updated at 3:01 p.m. ET

President Trump said Wednesday he intends to nominate a replacement for retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy from a list of names he first compiled during his 2016 campaign. He told reporters he had recently added five more names to the list. Here is a look at who is under consideration:

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Wednesday against public sector unions, drawing swift condemnation from Democrats and labor activists concerned about the effect on collective bargaining.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement Wednesday, setting the stage for what promises to be an epic political battle over his replacement.

A Trump nominee is likely to be far more conservative than Kennedy, who, though appointed by President Ronald Reagan, voted with the court's liberals in some key cases.

Updated at 10:50 a.m. ET

In a blow to organized labor, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that government workers who choose not to join a union cannot be charged for the cost of collective bargaining.

The vote was a predictable 5-4. Justice Samuel Alito wrote the majority opinion with the court's conservatives joining him.

The Ohio State University

In light of recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions on partisan gerrymandering in Wisconsin and Maryland, voting-rights groups have revised their lawsuit over how Ohio draws its congressional maps. 

In the sharply divided decision over President Trump's travel ban, the Supreme Court repudiated a notorious case from the last century: one that justified the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor pointed to what she called "stark parallels" between the 1944 Korematsu decision and Tuesday's ruling, which upheld Trump administration restrictions on would-be visitors from Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Venezuela, Somalia and Yemen.

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