Crimes & Courts

After a dozen tumultuous days in the White House, President Trump on Tuesday night found a way to unite his party, delight his most ardent supporters and change the storyline on his nascent presidency in a single stroke.

It wasn't magic that did it, it was the choice of Neil Gorsuch to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

President Trump has nominated conservative favorite Judge Neil Gorsuch to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court.

"Judge Gorsuch has a superb intellect, an unparalleled legal education, and a commitment to interpreting the Constitution according to its text. He will make an incredible justice as soon as the Senate confirms him," Trump said in announcing his pick.

President Trump has made his pick to fill the ninth seat on the Supreme Court.

So now what?

President Trump's executive order on immigration late Friday ignited nationwide protests — and a slew of legal challenges.

At least four federal judges across the country have blocked part of the order and temporarily ensured refugees and travelers who reached U.S. soil would not be deported.

Here's an explanation of what happened so far and what could come next.

lethal injection chair
Wikipedia Commons

A federal judge has declared Ohio's new lethal injection process unconstitutional and delayed three upcoming executions.

President Trump says he plans to announce his pick for the U.S. Supreme Court next week.

The Trump administration has begun to float specific names for the high court's vacancy. The consensus seems to be that among the finalists on Trump's shortlist are Neil Gorsuch, a judge on the federal appeals court based in Denver; Judge William H. Pryor Jr. of Alabama, who served on the federal appeals court based in Atlanta; and Judge Thomas Hardiman of Pittsburgh, who serves on the 3rd Circuit Federal Court of Appeals.

Jonathan Waters
Nick Houser / WOSU

A fired Ohio State University marching band director has dropped all his legal claims against the university in exchange for it agreeing not to try to recover its costs from him.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on Wednesday in a dispute that advocates describe as the most important case involving public school special education in three decades.

At issue is whether federal law requires public schools to provide more than the bare minimum in special services for children with disabilities. With millions of children qualifying for these services, the court's ruling could have a profound effect.

Judge Marilyn Zayas was sworn in Monday morning to the First District Court of Appeals. She is the first Latina elected as a judge in Ohio.

On Jan. 20, 2016, exactly a year before a new president would be sworn into office, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia announced the court's 8-to-1 decision reinstating the death penalty for two Kansas brothers.

It was the last time the 79-year-old Scalia would announce an opinion. Three weeks later, on a hunting trip in Texas, the conservative icon died in his sleep.

A California judge has been cleared of misconduct after sentencing a Stanford University student to six months in jail for sexually assaulting a woman earlier this year.

"The California Commission on Judicial Performance ruled Monday that there was no evidence that Santa Clara County Judge Aaron Persky displayed bias in handing down a sentence decried as too lenient by critics across the country," The Associated Press reported.

Retired architect Tom Chudzinski had been travelling the western U.S. in his motor home when he awoke one night to local sheriff's deputies knocking on his door in New Mexico.

Smelling alcohol on Chudzinski's breath, the officers arrested him on the suspicion that he had crashed his RV into a parked vehicle at a nearby truck stop. Although they hadn't seen him driving, they booked him into an Albuquerque jail.

Chudzinski couldn't make bail, so he remained behind bars for 34 days.

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A judge has ruled that one of Ohio's few remaining abortion clinics can remain open while fighting to keep its state operating license.

The U.S. Supreme Court says it will not consider a challenge to the terms of a concussion-related settlement between the National Football League and more than 20,000 retired players.

The deal settled a class-action filed by former players who accused the NFL of covering up what it knew about the link between playing professional football and the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.

For more than a quarter century, two legislative districts in North Carolina have been ground zero in a fight over race and redistricting. In the course of that time, Republicans have taken control of the state Legislature, and the two political parties have reversed their legal positions regarding the use of race and drawing district lines.

YouTube/Columbus City Attorney's Office

The second-longest serving city attorney in Columbus history, Rick Pfeiffer, says he will not seek another term. 

The U.S. Supreme Court takes up important immigration questions Wednesday, even as President-elect Donald Trump talks of pushing for more deportations. The legal issue before the court tests whether people who are detained for more than six months have a right to a bond hearing.

Pool Photo

CINCINNATI (AP) - Another new judge has been assigned to the second trial of a white former University of Cincinnati police officer in the slaying of a black motorist. The first trial judge and two successors disqualified themselves.

Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge Leslie Ghiz was named Tuesday to preside over the retrial of Ray Tensing on murder and voluntary manslaughter charges in the July 2015 shooting of Sam DuBose.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday hears a case that questions intellectual disabilities and the death penalty — specifically, what standards states may use in determining whether a defendant convicted of murder is mentally deficient.

Ohio Supreme Court
Flickr / Creative Commons

The Ohio Ballot Board says a proposed constitutional amendment to impose term limits on Ohio Supreme Court justices and remove special legal protections provided to state lawmakers and their staffs would be two separate ballot issues.

As voters go to the polls on Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will be revisiting the 2008 collapse of the housing market, and the resulting drop in property values and property tax revenue. At issue are two cases testing whether Miami can sue Wells Fargo and Bank of America under the Fair Housing Act for alleged racial discrimination in mortgage terms and foreclosures.

Specifically, the city of Miami alleges that the banks discriminated against black and Latino homeowners in terms and fees.

University of Cincinnati

Civil rights activists are criticizing the racial makeup of the jury seated for the murder trial of a white University of Cincinnati police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man.

Mark Buckawicki / Wikimedia Commons

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Democrats are accusing Republicans and Donald Trump's presidential campaign of conspiring to intimidate voters in at least four key states.

Flickr Creative Commons

Advocates for the homeless and the Ohio Democratic Party are asking the Supreme Court to block election rules that could disqualify thousands of absentee and provisional ballots in the battleground state because of minor mistakes or omissions.

This election, appeals court judge Pat DeWine is vying for a position on the Ohio Supreme Court.

But because DeWine's father is Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, leaders from the Ohio Democratic Party say if he's elected, it would be a conflict of interest. 

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