Crimes & Courts

Was Selecting A Supreme Court Judge Always So Divisive?

Jul 11, 2018

"Solid choice." "As right-wing as they come." "Clearly qualified." "Serious concerns."

Those are the words Brad Wenstrup (R-OH), Aftab Pureval (D-Hamilton County), Rob Portman (R-OH) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH), respectively, used to describe their reaction to President Donald Trump’s choice of Brett Kavanaugh to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is retiring later this month. So depending on what side of the aisle you fall on, you're either ecstatic or terrified.

The First Amendment

Jul 11, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

The First Amendment has played a key role in several U.S. Supreme Court decisions this year -- from organized labor fees to non-members who enjoy the fruits of collective bargaining to the question of whether a Colorado baker was obliged to make a wedding cake for a gay couple.

Ohio U.S. Senator Rob Portman
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Ohio’s two Senators are weighing in on President Trump’s U.S. Supreme Court pick.

What would the U.S. look like without Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case that legalized abortion nationwide?

That's the question now that President Trump has chosen conservative Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Over a dozen years as a judge on the federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., Brett Kavanaugh has weighed in on controversial cases involving guns, abortion, health care and religious liberty.

But after Kavanaugh emerged on President Trump's shortlist for the Supreme Court, a suggestion the judge made in a 2009 law review article swiftly took center stage:

"Provide sitting presidents with a temporary deferral of civil suits and of criminal prosecutions and investigations," Kavanaugh proposed.

President Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy was met with swift partisan response from many in Congress, emphasizing the power of a narrow group of uncommitted senators.

A large number of Senate Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., immediately announced that they plan to vote against Kavanaugh.

Updated at 9:28 p.m. ET

President Trump has chosen Brett Kavanaugh to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. If confirmed, Trump's choice would solidify the high court's conservative majority and continue the president's push to shift the federal bench to the right.

Trump announced his choice with a prime-time address from the White House East Room.

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

A national group that advocates for so-called “Right to Work” policies is threatening to sue Ohio if it doesn’t stop collecting dues from non-unionized state workers.

One day after Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement, a group calling itself Demand Justice staged a rally outside the court's front steps.

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