Crimes & Courts

Anna Schiffbauer
Student Press Law Center

An Otterbein University graduate who sued for access to on campus police records, while working at a student-run news website won her case yesterday before the Ohio Supreme Court. 

Ohio Supreme Court
Flickr / Creative Commons

A divided Ohio Supreme Court has ruled that private colleges' police departments are subject to the state's open records law.

Lawmakers Look for Ways to Reform Criminal Sentencing in Ohio

May 20, 2015
Ohio Supreme Court
Flickr / Creative Commons

While much of the focus is still on the budget, Ohio lawmakers are working on many other issues they’d like to address before summer break. Some legislators are taking a serious look at reforming the state’s criminal sentencing structure.

.

A drum major instructor for Ohio State University's marching band who is accused of sexually assaulting a female student has been indicted on rape charges.

Twenty-eight-year-old Stewart Kitchen is suspected of assaulting an Ohio State student at his home on April 16.

Ex-Ohio State Band Director Files Defamation Suit

May 8, 2015
Jonathan Waters
Nick Houser / WOSU

Ohio State’s fired marching band director has filed another lawsuit. The suit claims the university damaged his reputation so badly he can’t get work.

Tom Borgerding, WOSU Radio

Federal prosecutors say a court hearing is needed to discuss dealing with classified information in the case of an Ohio man accused of plotting a U.S. terror attack.

SCOTUS Hears Arguments on Same-Sex Marriage

Apr 29, 2015
Jeff Kubina / Wikimedia

Yesterday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments on same-sex marriage. We look at the legal aspects of the cases, and hear from organizations on both sides of the issue. 

Same-sex marriage supporters gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court
Chad Griffin / Twitter

Ohio is among four states whose ban on same-sex marriage was argued before the U.S. Supreme Court today. 

Marc Spindleman, a constitutional law expert at the Moritz College of Law at Ohio State, says the justices must decide two pivotal questions brought forth in the challenge to the states' same-sex-marriage ban.

Pages