Business & Economy

Updated at 2:50 a.m. ET on Wednesday

The Trump administration has published a preliminary list of additional Chinese products that could be targeted with tariffs in the escalating trade war between the world's two biggest economies. The list covers some $200 billion in Chinese exports that could be hit by a 10 percent tariff. It's an extensive list of over 6,000 goods that include seafood, propane and toilet paper, among many other things.

Several months into the Trump administration's aggressive rollout of tariffs on imported products, the results are piling up across the American business landscape. And not all of them are negative.

In Hillsboro, Ore., a solar plant got a second chance at life after tariffs on imported solar panels went into effect in January.

Updated at 8:15 a.m. ET

As the day dawned across the U.S. on Friday, a new economic reality dawned with it: The tariffs long threatened against billions of dollars in Chinese goods took effect just at midnight ET while many Americans were sleeping — but Beijing was ready immediately with a wake-up call of its own.

The Trump administration is doubling down on its trade rhetoric, even as other countries ready tariffs on American goods and U.S. business groups part company with the president over his trade policies.

Eric Gay / Associated Press

For the first time, a company has been given the go-ahead to start growing marijuana in Ohio. The group just received an official cultivator license from the state.

Wikimedia Commons

The Ohio State University says a foundation has made a $17 million commitment to set up an entrepreneurship center within the Fischer College of Business.

As seen in recent weeks, how companies view President Trump's tariffs on foreign steel and aluminum depends a lot on what business they're in. 

Dog on restaurant patio
Lindsay Attaway/Flickr

The Ohio General Assembly has let the dogs out.

On Wednesday, the Ohio Senate passed a bill that would allow dogs on restaurant patios, something that business groups see as a way to let companies expand their creativity.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Two of the largest workplace immigration raids yet under the Trump administration, carried out just weeks apart in Ohio, have upended the lives of hundreds of children caught in the middle.

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