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Connect with all your favorite stories and programs from 89.7 NPR News, Classical 101, and WOSU TV on Instagram. Enriching lives and expanding minds in Central Ohio, now with more photos.

M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Both of Summit County’s resettlement agencies are likely to survive the Trump administration’s latest restructuring of refugee efforts nationwide. But they’re also dealing with major changes in numbers, policy and expectations. 

David Sommerstein / North Country Public Radio

There are few regions in the world where you can make true "ice wine," a sweet vintage fit for after dinner sipping or dessert courses.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Two-thirds of Appalachia's coal industry jobs have disappeared since the 1990s. Now the region is hoping tourism will help rebuild its economy by tapping into history and its rugged natural beauty.

Esther Honig

During the Tuesday morning commute,  the temperature hovered around -3 degrees outside Linden Transit Center on Cleveland Avenue. The holidays are over, and for many that means it's back to work. 

For some commuters, a new bus line launched on January 1 has made getting there a little easier.

Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

Ohio Department of Health statistics show the number of abortions in Ohio was at an all-time low in 2016, but that didn’t keep the legislature from passing more abortion legislation this year.

Fair Districts Ohio / Facebook

On election night two years ago, Catherine Turcer of Common Cause Ohio couldn’t have been more thrilled.

“It’s like Christmas,” Turcer said. “I got the best present, and the thing that’s exciting is that this is for all of us.”

Coming Soon: Stories for the Ages

Dec 19, 2017

Everyone is getting older, but that doesn’t mean personal development has to stop. How do we keep growing as we age, even into our later years?

Local life coach, author and educator John Schuster takes a look at aging. Throughout the series we'll explore how to have purpose, age tough, grow old, have a spiritual life and have some fun along the way.

When Ronson Rowley was a teen, he said he used to sneak into a nightclub called the Ten Bar. “It was the only black gay club here in Indianapolis,” he recalled. One night he ran into his uncle.

“He looked me dead in the face,” he recalled. “And [he] said what are you doing here? I said, the same thing you’re doing here.”


Adora Namigadde / WOSU

Circleville residents are more than familiar with the rumble of railroad tracks, as trains carting cargo pass through their town. Up to 60 trains travel through the tiny city every day.

Library of Congress

This story is part of the Curious Cbus project. You ask the questions, you vote for one of the questions and we answer.

Listener Conor Morris must have reached the end of his rope when he asked WOSU, “Why are there so many god dang townships in Ohio named ‘Paint’?"

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