women's health

Updated at 10:51 a.m. ET on Wednesday

The U.S. Supreme Court refused on Tuesday to hear a challenge to an Arkansas abortion law that, in practice, bars abortions by pill instead of by surgical procedure.

The result is that Arkansas is now the only state in the country that essentially bans abortion by pill, a method certified by the federal Food and Drug Administration as at least as safe as surgical abortions. The Supreme Court's decision not to intervene in the case at this point, however, is not final.

Samantha Blackwell was working her way through a master's degree at Cleveland State University when she found out she was pregnant.

"I was 25, in really good health. I had been an athlete all my life. I threw shot put for my college, so I was in my prime," she says with a laugh.

Wikimedia Commons

While the number of minorities living in the U.S. is expected to exceed 50 percent by 2044, there is a significant lack in representation of these communities among medical researchers and study participants. Today we look into efforts being made to improve inclusion of minorities in such research, including a new study that will ensure 51 percent of its one million participants come from underrepresented groups.

We then discuss the benefits of exercise on health with New York Times Well Blog columnist Gretchen Reynolds and take a look at women's health ahead of Mother's Day.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Three national reproductive rights groups are suing the Trump administration, arguing that changes to the federal Title X program will put the health of millions of low-income patients at risk by prioritizing practices such as the rhythm method over comprehensive sexual health services.

Niraj Antani
Niraj Antani / Ohio House

A new bill has been introduced in the Ohio House that would require health classes cover fetal development and offer students information on where they can find prenatal care. But it doesn’t include other related information.

Updated on April 19 at 3 p.m. ET

Maile Pearl Bowlsbey is just over a week old and already is helping force more change in the Senate than most seasoned lawmakers can even dream. On Thursday she joined her mother, Illinois Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth, on the Senate floor for a vote.

The newborn's appearance was made possible by a unanimous decision by the Senate on Wednesday evening to change its rules, which typically allow only senators and a handful of staff into the Senate chamber during votes. Now, lawmakers can bring along children under 1.

London Scout / Unsplash

During her second pregnancy, 25-year old Jessica Roach thought she would have a smooth experience, like the first one, but her health deteriorated.

An Ohio fertility clinic said that the remote alarm system on its storage tank was turned off, so it didn't know that the temperature had fluctuated, and that the consequences were worse than it initially thought — all 4,000 eggs and embryos in the cryofreezer are likely nonviable.

When journalist Maya Dusenbery was in her 20s, she started experiencing progressive pain in her joints, which she learned was caused by rheumatoid arthritis.

As she began to research her own condition, Dusenbery realized how lucky she was to have been diagnosed relatively easily. Other women with similar symptoms, she says, "experienced very long diagnostic delays and felt ... that their symptoms were not taken seriously."

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

A newly introduced bill from Ohio Republicans that would outlaw abortion entirely is getting a lot of attention on social media and around water coolers. But will it get serious consideration from lawmakers, especially considering some abortion bills – including far less extreme proposals – have not passed? 

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