voter rolls

John Minchillo / Associated Press

Voting rights groups say they are getting reports of misinformation and misleading text messages.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Secretary of State says no voters will be removed from the rolls before the November election, in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding Ohio’s process of deleting inactive voters’ registrations.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court may decide a case that could change how Ohio removes people from voter rolls. The court heard arguments in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute in January. 

Federal law lays out a process for taking people’s names off the registered voter list if they have moved to a new address and haven’t updated election officials.

Oak Harbor Mayor Joe Helle (left) and Secretary of State Jon Husted spar outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the arguments in Husted v. APRI.
DOREYSCHEIMER / Twitter

The U.S Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case challenging Ohio’s controversial method for maintaining its voter rolls, and the major players from the case were there to hear it.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Ohio officials and civil liberty advocates are in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday for a U.S. Supreme Court case that could have implications for how several states update their voter rolls.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided Wednesday over whether Ohio's so-called use-it-or-lose-it voter registration rule violates federal law.

Ohio, which has the most aggressive voter-purge system in the country, currently strikes voters from the registration rolls if they fail to vote in two consecutive elections — and if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form.

Joseph Helle

Former Army Sgt. Joseph Helle didn't realize something was wrong until he was at his polling place.

Wikimedia / WOSU

Opponents are lining up to urge the U.S. Supreme Court to throw out Ohio's system for removing inactive voters from the rolls.

US Supreme Court
Joe Ravi / Wikimedia commons

The Supreme Court will decide whether Ohio wrongfully purged eligible voters from the state's registration list.

Voting booths
Flickr.com / Flickr

The state’s chief election officer says the time is now to get ready for the role Ohio will play as a battleground presidential state. 

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