voter purge

U.S. Supreme Court
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's political podcast from WOSU Public Media, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown talk about how voters are purged from election rolls and why the issue reached the highest court in the land.

Voter turnout will likely be crucial in November's election, as recent polling shows the race for governor is extremely close. Chrissy Thompson, Statehouse reporter for the Cincinnati Enquirer, joins the show.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling has cleared the way for states to take a tougher approach to maintaining their voter rolls, but will they?

John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Secretary of State says no voters will be removed from the rolls before the November election, in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding Ohio’s process of deleting inactive voters’ registrations.

In Hamilton County – and in large urban counties all over Ohio – Republicans and Democrats have been arguing about the practice of purging voter rolls ever since Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted became Ohio's chief election officer in 2011.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that Ohio can clean up its voting rolls by clearing people who haven't voted in a while.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Do you have to vote even if you don't want to? Not doing so could put you on the path to losing your vote in some states.

Oak Harbor Mayor Joe Helle (left) and Secretary of State Jon Husted spar outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the arguments in Husted v. APRI.
DOREYSCHEIMER / Twitter

The U.S Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case challenging Ohio’s controversial method for maintaining its voter rolls, and the major players from the case were there to hear it.

Ohio's Voter Purge

Jan 10, 2018
Joebeone / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments today supporting and opposing Ohio's practice of purging inactive voters from the rolls. Coming up, we'll hear from both sides of the issue and consider the policy's legality and impact on voting in Ohio.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided Wednesday over whether Ohio's so-called use-it-or-lose-it voter registration rule violates federal law.

Ohio, which has the most aggressive voter-purge system in the country, currently strikes voters from the registration rolls if they fail to vote in two consecutive elections — and if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form.

Joseph Helle

Former Army Sgt. Joseph Helle didn't realize something was wrong until he was at his polling place.