voter purge

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is taking extra steps to clarify the state's process for clearing voter rolls, outlining some new initiatives aimed at helping voters stay up-to-date.

Ohio Democratic Senator Sherrod Brown
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Ohio’s top Democratic elected official is fighting the state’s process when it comes to scratching voters off the rolls. The new bill is in response to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling approving Ohio’s voter roll cleanup process.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Democrats are saying thousands of voters could be affected by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision upholding the way Ohio deletes inactive registrations. But Secretary of State Jon Husted, who’s also the Republican candidate for lieutenant governor, says the law prevents voters from being removed before the fall election.

U.S. Supreme Court
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's political podcast from WOSU Public Media, hosts Mike Thompson and Steve Brown talk about how voters are purged from election rolls and why the issue reached the highest court in the land.

Voter turnout will likely be crucial in November's election, as recent polling shows the race for governor is extremely close. Chrissy Thompson, Statehouse reporter for the Cincinnati Enquirer, joins the show.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling has cleared the way for states to take a tougher approach to maintaining their voter rolls, but will they?

John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Secretary of State says no voters will be removed from the rolls before the November election, in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding Ohio’s process of deleting inactive voters’ registrations.

In Hamilton County – and in large urban counties all over Ohio – Republicans and Democrats have been arguing about the practice of purging voter rolls ever since Republican Secretary of State Jon Husted became Ohio's chief election officer in 2011.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that Ohio can clean up its voting rolls by clearing people who haven't voted in a while.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Do you have to vote even if you don't want to? Not doing so could put you on the path to losing your vote in some states.

Oak Harbor Mayor Joe Helle (left) and Secretary of State Jon Husted spar outside the U.S. Supreme Court after the arguments in Husted v. APRI.
DOREYSCHEIMER / Twitter

The U.S Supreme Court heard arguments Wednesday in a case challenging Ohio’s controversial method for maintaining its voter rolls, and the major players from the case were there to hear it.

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