Utica Shale

Ohio State Highway Patrol Aviation Section

Just over a month ago, an explosion at a Utica shale drilling site in Southeast Ohio's Belmont County forced evacuation of nearby homes. It took nearly three weeks to cap the well. Investigators are now sorting out what happened, and how to keep it from happening somewhere else.

Nexus Pipeline
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The federal tax overhaul passed in December by Congress is raising questions about how changes may affect Ohio’s the energy industry.

Simon Fraser University

Larry Hecht runs Pier-48, an intermodal terminal on the Ohio River for loading and off-loading barges. At the height of the shale boom, it got 25 bulk shipments of drilling supplies like barite a month.

Then came the bust, and that traffic stopped.

They landed, one after another, in 2015: plans for nearly a dozen interstate pipelines to move natural gas beneath rivers, mountains and people's yards. Like spokes on a wheel, they'd spread from Appalachia to markets in every direction.

Together these new and expanded pipelines — comprising 2,500 miles of steel in all — would double the amount of gas that could flow out of Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. The cheap fuel will benefit consumers and manufacturers, the developers promise.