Utica Shale

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The federal tax overhaul passed in December by Congress is raising questions about how changes may affect Ohio’s the energy industry.

Simon Fraser University

Larry Hecht runs Pier-48, an intermodal terminal on the Ohio River for loading and off-loading barges. At the height of the shale boom, it got 25 bulk shipments of drilling supplies like barite a month.

Then came the bust, and that traffic stopped.

They landed, one after another, in 2015: plans for nearly a dozen interstate pipelines to move natural gas beneath rivers, mountains and people's yards. Like spokes on a wheel, they'd spread from Appalachia to markets in every direction.

Together these new and expanded pipelines — comprising 2,500 miles of steel in all — would double the amount of gas that could flow out of Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. The cheap fuel will benefit consumers and manufacturers, the developers promise.