trade

Updated at 8:07 a.m. ET Friday

China's government on Friday hit back at President Trump's latest call for more tariffs by saying it was prepared to "follow through to the end and fight back resolutely."

President Trump upped the ante in his trade dispute with China Thursday by signaling his willingness to impose more tariffs than previously announced.

In response to the Trump administration's threats to place tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese goods, China has threatened to sanction $50 billion in U.S. exports, including airplanes, cars and chemicals. These tariffs would also target some of America's most successful exporters — farmers.

As the sun was coming up Wednesday, farmers at Betty's Truck Stop near Sweet Springs, Mo., took their coffee with a serving of bad news.

Updated at 5:26 p.m. ET

China's leaders followed President Trump in taking another step toward a new trade war, announcing a plan to put steep tariffs on $50 billion of U.S. imports. China's proposed 25 percent tariffs would target a wide range of American products, from soybeans and whiskey to airplanes and cars.

"China currently buys about $14 billion worth of American soybeans each year — almost a third of the entire U.S. crop," NPR's Dan Charles reports for our Newscast unit. "Prices for U.S. soybeans tumbled by 3 to 5 percent" on the news, Dan adds.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

China is retaliating against the Trump administration's tariffs on Chinese goods, imposing charges of its own Monday on a list of 128 imports from the United States, including agricultural products ranging from fruit to wine to frozen pork.

China's tariffs add fuel to what many economists fear is a burgeoning trade war between the two economic superpowers.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Ohio’s Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown, has introduced a bill to review foreign investments and their impact on U.S. workers, ahead of today's anticipated announcement of major tariffs from the Trump administration.

Whirlpool

Manufacturers who make products with steel and aluminum are expected to see their costs rise after the President's tariff goes into effect. But Whirlpool Corporation, which makes washing machines at a plant in Clyde, may come out clean. 

Sherrod Brown
Nick Castele / ideastream

Hours before President Trump is expected to unveil details about his proposed tariff on steel and aluminum imports, Ohio's U.S. Senators are expressing their reservations.

Updated at 4:47 p.m. ET

President Trump ordered steep tariffs on imported steel and aluminum from every country except Canada and Mexico. It's the boldest move to date for the president who campaigned on a protectionist platform that is sharply at odds with Republicans' free trade orthodoxy.

skeeze / Pixabay

Ohio manufacturers are giving mixed responses to tariffs that President Trump says he’ll place on imported steel and aluminum.

Updated at 5:14 p.m. ET

President Trump promised steel and aluminum executives Thursday that he will levy tariffs on imports of their products in coming weeks. He said the imported steel will face tariffs of 25 percent, while aluminum will face tariffs of 10 percent.

"We're going to build our steel industry back and we're going to build our aluminum industry back," Trump told reporters.

Pages