terrorism

John Minchillo / Associated Press

The U.S. Department of the Treasury took action this week against Abdullah Ibrahim al-Faisal, a Jamaica-based cleric they say provides "recruitment services" to ISIS and helped influence the Ohio State student who injured 13 in a car-and-knife attack last year.

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Abdul Razak Ali Artan, the 18-year-old Ohio State University student who last November rammed a car into a group of pedestrians before attacking people with a large knife, might have been influenced by the Islamic State group, but he was not directed by them.

Esther Honig

Singing the alma mater "Carmen Ohio," Ohio State University students and faculty gathered at the Ohio Union on Tuesday to commemorate the anniversary of last year's car-and-knife attack on campus.

First responder vehicles on the scene of the knife attack at Ohio State on November 28, 2016 attack
Robert Moormann / Ohio State University

The Ohio State University will host a “moment of reflection” in the Ohio Union on Tuesday, the first anniversary of a car-and-knife attack that injured 13 people.

As the Islamic State has crumbled in its core territory in the Middle East, the extremist group has pressed individual supporters to carry out vehicle attacks in the West.

The lethal assaults have traumatized European cities for more than a year, and authorities are pointing to a similar motivation in the New York City attack that killed eight people on Tuesday.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the attack was a "classic case of a radicalization of a domestic jihadist who associated with ISIS and this is their new playbook. Very simple. Use a vehicle to cause harm."

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

A criminal complaint filed by federal prosecutors accuses Sayfullo Saipov of carrying out the truck attack in Lower Manhattan that killed at least eight people and injured a dozen more on Tuesday.

Esther Honig

Since a bombing killed 358 people in the Somali capital of Mogadishu October 14, members of Columbus' Somali community have been working to deliver aid. Local fundraising efforts over the last five days raised more than $13,000.

The initial numbers were staggering — and they grew ever more devastating as rescue workers sifted through debris: More than 300 people dead. At least 300 people injured. A blast area the size of "two or three football fields," as one witness told The Guardian.

President Trump said he would let his generals manage the fight against the Islamic State. And so far, he's done that.

The U.S. and its coalition partners carried out more than 5,000 airstrikes in Syria and Iraq combined in August. That's the highest monthly figure since the air campaign began three years ago.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

British Prime Minister Theresa May called Friday's morning rush-hour attack on a London subway train that wounded at least 29 people a "cowardly" act and raised the country's threat level to critical.

London's Metropolitan Police are investigating the explosion on the train at the Parsons Green station in the capital, calling it an act of terrorism. The Islamic State's Amaq news agency said the militant group was responsible for the attack, but that claim could not be independently verified.

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