Technology

Aaron Yoo / Flickr

A legal case in Columbus that’s recently come to light is raising questions about the intersection of technology and privacy.

Nick Evans / WOSU

On the corner of Fifth and Main in downtown Marysville on Thursday, officials from Honda, government types and curious shop workers hoisted cell phones to see a new smart intersection project in action. Every few minutes, a Honda SUV heads toward the intersection and stops short—the driver warned of a pedestrian, emergency vehicle or red light runner.

The Dutch government is considering a proposal to ban the use of smartphones and other "mobile electronic devices" on bicycles.

Infrastructure Minister Cora van Nieuwenhuizen published the draft legislation on Thursday, NL Times reports. If approved, it could go into effect in the summer of 2019.

It is already illegal to use a phone while driving a motor vehicle in the Netherlands, the news site says. Offenders face a fine of more than $250.

Lime electric scooter
Gabe Rosenberg / WOSU

Columbus City Council has sided with Mayor Andrew Ginther in his quest to keep electric scooters off of city sidewalks.

Prize winners and other observers look on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio, as another $2.4 million is awarded through the Ohio Opioid Technology Challenge.
Julie Carr Smyth / AP

The winners of the second phase the Ohio Opioid Technology Challenge were announced on Wednesday.

Each of the 12 proposals were picked from more than 50 entries submitted worldwide and received $200,000. The winners now have a chance to win a piece of the $8 million that Governor John Kasich set aside for the challenge.

Jason Reynolds / WYSO

At the Russ Research Center in Beavercreek, 30 kids between the ages of 12 and 16 are building robots with the help of mentors.

Gage Skidmore/Flickr

The Justice Department will meet with state attorneys generals this month as part of an investigation of whether social media companies are censoring conservative speech. 

This comes after President Trump and other prominent conservatives complained that companies, such as Facebook and Twitter, had unfairly removed or banned content. 

Today on Tech Tuesday, what that investigation could look like. 

Over the past year, dockless electric scooters have descended on city sidewalks almost as if they fell from the sky. From Austin, Texas, to Denver to Cambridge, Mass., these compact two-wheelers are leading what researchers are calling the "micro-mobility revolution."

But their arrival has not been without controversy.

A Cincinnati council member said Wednesday any agreement between the city and Bird, the electric scooter company that launched here recently, should include language for the company to cover damages suffered by victims of misuse of the motorized scooters.

A federal judge in Washington State has extended a court order blocking a Texas-based company called Defense Distributed from posting designs for 3D-printed guns on the Internet.

U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik previously issued a temporary restraining order at the end of July blocking the designs; now he has granted a preliminary injunction, which bars the designs from being posted online until a court case is resolved.

Northeast Ohio luxury car dealership owner Bernie Moreno talks about blockchain, along with a group of technology business leaders and Republican state representatives.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Experts say the decentralized, tamperproof digital ledger system known as "blockchain" has the potential to completely change commerce, culture and communication, as the internet and smartphones have. Republican state lawmakers say they want in on it.

An audience gathers around the transparent 14-foot-long "culinary instrument" in a restaurant called Creator in San Francisco's SoMa neighborhood.

Steve Brown / WOSU

Right here in Columbus are a series of databases that some scientists and business leaders call the world’s most valuable collection of scientific data. This week, they'll be used to train some of the world’s best young scientists.

Pixabay

Ahead of the midterm elections, Facebook and other social media platforms are cracking down on fraudulent users and groups that could be part of election meddling. 

Greater Columbus Convention Center / Facebook

How to use technology to improve the economy, housing and education top the agenda at the National Urban League conference in Columbus this week. 

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