supreme court

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh shares one important view with President Trump: Both are deeply suspicious of any attempt to limit the president's power over executive branch officials.

That view could have important consequences for special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into the Russian interference in the 2016 election, which includes allegations of collusion and possible obstruction of justice.

State of Ohio / Governor's office

Gov. John Kasich has finished dealing with executions for the remainder of his time in office following a modern-era record of death penalty commutations.

Three-quarters of Americans think the Supreme Court should not overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that made abortion legal nationwide, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds.

But that result includes a degree of nuance.

Just 17 percent say they support overturning Roe outright. Another 24 percent say they want Roe kept in place, but they want to see more restrictions on abortion.

In the battle over the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, the usual suspects are lining up in support and opposition. At the grass roots, however, there is one new entry nervously eyeing the Kavanaugh nomination. It is March For Our Lives, started by high school students in Parkland, Fla., after the shooting there, and aimed ultimately at enacting more effective gun regulations.

The First Amendment

Jul 20, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

The First Amendment has played a key role in several U.S. Supreme Court decisions this year -- from organized labor fees to non-members who enjoy the fruits of collective bargaining to the question of whether a Colorado baker was obliged to make a wedding cake for a gay couple.

Today on All Sides with Ann Fisher we examine the origin of the concept of free speech, and why Justice Elena Kagan in her dissent in the organized labor case said the ruling had “weaponized the First Amendment.” 

Guests:

Was Selecting A Supreme Court Judge Always So Divisive?

Jul 11, 2018

"Solid choice." "As right-wing as they come." "Clearly qualified." "Serious concerns."

Those are the words Brad Wenstrup (R-OH), Aftab Pureval (D-Hamilton County), Rob Portman (R-OH) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH), respectively, used to describe their reaction to President Donald Trump’s choice of Brett Kavanaugh to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is retiring later this month. So depending on what side of the aisle you fall on, you're either ecstatic or terrified.

The First Amendment

Jul 11, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

The First Amendment has played a key role in several U.S. Supreme Court decisions this year -- from organized labor fees to non-members who enjoy the fruits of collective bargaining to the question of whether a Colorado baker was obliged to make a wedding cake for a gay couple.

Ohio U.S. Senator Rob Portman
J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Ohio’s two Senators are weighing in on President Trump’s U.S. Supreme Court pick.

What would the U.S. look like without Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case that legalized abortion nationwide?

That's the question now that President Trump has chosen conservative Judge Brett Kavanaugh as his nominee to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Over a dozen years as a judge on the federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., Brett Kavanaugh has weighed in on controversial cases involving guns, abortion, health care and religious liberty.

But after Kavanaugh emerged on President Trump's shortlist for the Supreme Court, a suggestion the judge made in a 2009 law review article swiftly took center stage:

"Provide sitting presidents with a temporary deferral of civil suits and of criminal prosecutions and investigations," Kavanaugh proposed.

Pages