students

Crowdfunding Classrooms

Jul 18, 2018
Flickr

Teachers in Ohio often spend their own money to outfit classrooms. As costs rise and budgets shrink, many teachers have turned to online fundraising, or crowdfunding, attracting outside support for education.

The popular DonorsChoose.org crowdfunding website, for example, has raised funds for more than a million projects since 2000 and currently hosts more than 2,000 initiatives for Ohio alone. 

A new report from the Ohio Auditor's office, however, recommends school districts adopt policies that regulate the online fundraising.

Pxhere

Federal law requires students with disabilities to spend as much time as possible in general education classrooms, but a study from Ohio State University has found that’s not happening in Ohio, or the rest of the country.

Our Take A Number series is exploring problems around the world through the lens of a single number.

Some high school students think of applying to colleges as a full-time job. There are essays and tests, loads of financial documents to assemble and calculations to make. After all that comes a big decision — one of the biggest of their young lives.

For top students who come from low-income families, the challenge is particularly difficult.

A classroom at Cleveland's John Hay High School.
Ashton Marra / Ideastream

A new Stanford University analysis of state and national test scores shows more Ohio students pass state exams than similar nationwide tests, which researchers say means the state’s proficiency standards are too low.

When Ohio’s scores on the National Assessment of Education Progress, or NAEP, exam were released last month, they showed almost no academic growth for Ohio fourth and eighth graders, much like the rest of the country.

In fact, Florida was one of the only states to show progress, especially with low-income and black students.

Clare Roth / WOSU

Tyvek homewrap flaps over the unfinished wooden beams of the Luxe Belle, as a sign proclaims "Now Leasing." Another sign entices the first 20 renters with free Taco Bell for a year, a tie-in with the fast-food chain that will occupy the mixed-use development’s first floor.

Nick Evans / WOSU

More than 200 students left class at 10 a.m. on Friday and marched around the track at Upper Arlington HighSschool, as part of a national walkout demanding gun policy changes. 

Nick Evans, WOSU News

Students at about a dozen Central Ohio schools plan to stage another walkout on Friday morning, calling for gun reform and commemorating the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting.

When Lane Murdock, a high school sophomore, heard that 17 high school students and educators had been killed in a shooting in Parkland, Fla., she says she felt numb.

To her, and so many others, mass shootings can feel all too common in the U.S.

"In the time I've been in high school we've had the Pulse, Las Vegas and now, [the Parkland] shooting," Murdock says.

The Ohio State University

After two people fell from the same parking garage within four days, The Ohio State University president Michael Drake announced he's forming a task force to evaluate national best practices and provide recommendations within 60 days. 

Nick Evans / WOSU

Just 10 days after staging school walkouts across the nation, students are preparing another protest. On Saturday's March For Our Lives, they're again demanding Congressional action to address gun violence - this time, with a march on the Ohio Statehouse. 

A group of ten Cleveland students and educators will hit the skies Wednesday morning heading for the island of Puerto Rico.

The trip, which overlaps with the school district’s spring break, isn’t necessarily for fun. The group from Lincoln-West High School will be volunteering at a southern Puerto Rico elementary school and orphanage.

“In the elementary school, we’re going to create a mural for the community and also plant a [vegetable] garden there,” teacher and translator Awilda Morales said.

Nick Evans

Last weekend, Gayathri Mudigonda, Meena Jani and Noah Spaulding-Schecter gathered in a house to talk about why it had to happen—why, in just a few days, they would get up and leave class for exactly 17 minutes.

More than 100 teenagers at Rocky River High School joined thousands of their fellow students across Ohio  Wednesday who observed 17 minutes of silence in honor of the victims of the Parkland, Fla., school shooting.  There, the demonstration was about more than just the victims.

Tri-State students braved frigid temperatures and a pop-up snow squall to walk out of class Wednesday as part of a national effort to protest gun violence and remember the 17 victims of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

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