science

Bradhoc / Flickr

This Earth Day, tens of thousands of people are expected to take part in a “March for Science” in Washington, D.C., and at hundreds of satellite marches across the country - including Columbus. 

Science and Politics

Apr 20, 2017
lab
Conrad Johnson / U.S. Army RDECOM

Scientists across the country are taking to the streets this weekend to march for science. The march was inspired by the success of the Women's March in January and is meant to be a response to political policies that are at odds with scientific findings and principals. However, some scientists argue that science should remain unpolitical, and that a march undermines the credibility of the field. Join us today as we discuss the March for Science and the intersection of science and politics with a panel of guests.

Guests:

Seventeen-year-old Indrani Das just won the top high school science prize in the country. Das, who lives in Oradell, N.J., took home $250,000 from the former Intel Science Talent Search, now the Regeneron Science Talent Search, for her study of brain injuries and neuron damage. In her spare time, she's already working with patients as a certified EMT.

Flocks of birds or schools of fish often group together in massive numbers, and move as though they are a single organism with one brain.

The behavior is called a murmuration, and scientists are trying to figure out how — and why — the animals do it.

In my head, a person with the name Danny has a boyish face and a perpetual smile. Zoes have wide eyes and wild hair and an air of mild bemusement.

STEM Education at COSI

Feb 6, 2017
Center of Science and Industry in Columbus COSI
Derek Jensen / Wikipedia Commons

Dr. Frederic Bertley is the newest President and CEO of the Center of Science and Industry in Columbus. He spent the last eight years as vice-president of the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, where he implemented many STEM education programs for young people. Today we'll sit down with Dr. Bertley and discuss youth STEM education programs and what's new at COSI.

Guests:

Scientists have described a new kind of sea creature in what's now central China. It lived 540 million years ago, and the tiny, baggy organism could occupy a peripheral spot on our own evolutionary tree.

When scientists like Simon Conway Morris discover a new animal, they get to name it. He and his colleagues in China don't seem to give compliments where they aren't deserved.

A tiny self-propelled drug-delivery device might someday make taking antibiotics safer and more efficient. Think of it as a tiny submarine scooting around inside your stomach, fueled by the acid there.

Oral antibiotics are commonly prescribed life-saving drugs. Once an antibiotic is swallowed, it takes a trip to the stomach, where there's lots of acid. That stomach acid can break chemical bonds in the antibiotic and deactivate it.

Scientists are reporting the results of controversial experiments that they say are encouraging them to continue to try to develop embryos that are part-human and part-animal.

Girls in the first few years of elementary school are less likely than boys to say that their own gender is "really, really smart," and less likely to opt into a game described as being for super-smart kids, research finds.

The study, which appears Thursday in Science, comes amid a push to figure out why women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields. One line of research involves stereotypes, and how they might influence academic and career choices.

Scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency who want to publish or present their scientific findings likely will need to have their work reviewed on a "case by case basis" before it can be disseminated, according to a spokesman for the agency's transition team.

The Obama administration has dropped a controversial proposal that would have required all federally funded scientists to get permission from patients before using their cells, blood, tissue or DNA for research.

Pixabay

The average human diet is a lot different than just a few decades ago, let alone thousands of years ago. Such a drastic change in diet appears to be having some adverse effects on our teeth and jaw, which evolved to chomp nuts and other harder foods.

Dogs are celebrated everywhere these days for the clever things they and their brains can do, and the science of dog cognition continues to soar in popularity.

As a cat person, I can't help but add that cats, too, show off their savviness for science.

They Never Told Her That Girls Could Become Scientists

Jan 7, 2017

By many standards, Mireille Kamariza is at the top of the world.

She's a graduate student at one of the world's top universities, working on her Ph.D. with one of the world's top chemists. And she's tackling a tough problem — tuberculosis — that sickens nearly 10 million people a year.

People think of black holes as nightmare vacuum cleaners, sucking in everything in reach, from light to stars to Matthew McConaughey in the movie Interstellar. But, in real life, black holes don't consume everything that they draw in.

Terrorist attacks, hurricanes, a divisive U.S. election, Brexit — 2016 has not been easy. With the year coming to an end, we thought it was time to get some serious perspective — from the scale of the entire universe.

We're tackling big questions: what scientists know, and what they have yet to learn.

So before you ring in another year, take a moment to contemplate the billions of years that led to 2017 and the billions more yet to come.

Where Does Alzheimer's Treatment Go From Here?

Dec 29, 2016

In a disappointment to Alzheimer's patients and researchers, drugmaker Eli Lilly said in late November that a clinical trial of solanezumab, an experimental medication to treat the degenerative neurological condition, had failed.

By now, you've very likely heard the case for limiting sugar.

Over the past two years the World Health Organization and the U.S. Dietary Guidelines have begun urging us to consume no more than 10 percent of our daily calories from added sugar. Drinking more than one sugar-sweetened soda a day can put you over that limit.

In a technological tour de force, scientists have developed a new way to probe antimatter.

For the first time, researchers were able to zap antimatter atoms with a laser, then precisely measure the light let off by these strange anti-atoms. By comparing the light from anti-atoms with the light from regular atoms, they hope to answer one of the big mysteries of our universe: Why, in the early universe, did antimatter lose out to regular old matter?

In 2015, Lida Xing was visiting a market in northern Myanmar when a salesman brought out a piece of amber about the size of a pink rubber eraser. Inside, he could see a couple of ancient ants and a fuzzy brown tuft that the salesman said was a plant.

As soon as Xing saw it, he knew it wasn't a plant. It was the delicate, feathered tail of a tiny dinosaur.

When a robotic probe finally lands on a watery world like Jupiter's moon Europa, what do scientists have to see to definitively say whether the place has any life?

That's the question retired astronaut John Grunsfeld posed to some colleagues at NASA when he was in charge of the agency's science missions.

If you're curious about what people really think about some of the hottest of hot-button food controversies, the Pew Research Center has just the thing for you: a survey of attitudes toward genetic modification, organic food and the importance of eating healthfully.

The survey results are published in a 99-page report that can keep you occupied for days. But if you're pressed for time, here are some of the most interesting highlights that caught our eye.

Pixabay

A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University puts firmer numbers on the phenomenon of implicit racial bias. Researchers believe an unconscious "white preference" could impede the entry of African Americans into the medical profession, where they and other minorities are underrepresented.

The study was published in Academic Medicine, a journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges. To discuss implicit bias in medical school admissions, WOSU's Sam Hendren spoke to Dr. Quinn Capers IV, lead author of the study and the associate dean of admissions at Ohio State’s medical school.

Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium said it made the tough call to euthanize its only Grizzly bear Thursday. Ginger, who bore two cubs, was 40 years old.

Battelle

Columbus-based Battelle is helping federal officials prepare for a potential radiological, or “dirty bomb” terrorist attack in a U.S. city.

Ohio State University Honors Three Researchers

Jun 8, 2015
Tom Borgerding / WOSU News

Ohio State University is a $6-billion enterprise with more than 64,000 students. Much of its budget is driven by research grants. While some of the research is esoteric, some of the professors are academic heavyweights. 

10:00 Recent reports show that we have a shortage in students majoring in the the STEM areas: science, technology, engineering and mathematics. But why? What's the problem? And how are high schools and universities working to combat the issue? Guests

The Latest in Health and Medical News

Jul 5, 2012

11:00 On this hour of "All Sides," we'll give you all the updates on the latest in the world of health and medicine. Guest

  • Dr. John Swartzberg (Clinical Professor, Health and Medical Science, University of California Berkeley)

Read More Click here to visit the University of California Berkeley's Wellness Letter website.

11:00 “One hundred years ago, a baby had a 50 percent chance of dying,â€? Dr. Lawrence Dorr explained. “In 1900, the life expectancy was 47 years. Tuberculosis (TB) was the biggest killer of man through all history until 1950..." Today on the show, we'll hear about advances throughout medical history. Guest:

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