schools

The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the findings of its 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey Thursday, measuring the rates of drug use, instances of violence and suicidal thoughts and actions among the nation’s teens.

Fewer teenagers are using drugs and having sex, according to the survey results, but there are still many areas of concern for the public health agency.

Drug Use

Teachers have staged protests in recent weeks in West Virginia, Oklahoma, Kentucky, Colorado and Arizona. Some are fighting lawmakers who want to scale back their pensions.

It's no secret that many states have badly underfunded their teacher pension plans for decades and now find themselves drowning in debt. But this pensions fight is also complicated by one little-known fact:

A national review of Ohio’s pre-K system shows the state is struggling compared to other states to provide students access to a quality classroom.

The National Institute for Early Education Research, or NIEER, based at Rutgers University, has been ranking pre-K systems in its annual State of Preschool report since 2002.

Hundreds of students in Akron were among those prevented from beginning a state required exam Wednesday due to a computer glitch that impacted testing statewide. 

Testing resumed Thursday after a bug in the vendor’s system prevented students from logging in to their English Language Arts exams Wednesday.

A spokesperson with the Ohio Department of Education said ODE was notified Wednesday morning by AIR, the American Institutes for Research, of a problem with its log in system.

Debbie Holmes / WOSU

Columbus parents and students at West High School are concerned conditions inside the nearly 90-year old building will continue to decline. Ceiling tiles and plaster fall sporadically, and the building either gets too hot or too cold, depending on the weather.

The U.S. Surgeon General has issued an advisory, encouraging more Americans to carry the overdose reversing drug naloxone.

It comes in the form of an injection or a nasal spray, known as Narcan, and is regularly carried by firefighters, EMTs and police officers, but the antidote is also becoming more and more common in Ohio schools.

In Lisbon, Education is More Than English and Math

Students at David Anderson Junior and Senior High School in Lisbon, Ohio, file into the auditorium on a Thursday morning.

National test scores in reading and math show achievement growth has largely leveled off for Ohio students, much like the rest of the country.

The National Assessment of Education Progress, or NAEP, exam is given every two years to 4th and 8th graders. The test has measured student progress across states since the early 1990s, but in Ohio last year, there wasn’t much progress to be measured.

Scores for Ohio students largely mimicked 2015 results, which Peggy Carr, an assistant commissioner for NAEP, said was also true for the country.

One in five teachers do not report incidents of violence they experience in their classrooms, according to a study led by an Ohio State University researcher.

The study, paid for by the American Psychological Association, surveyed 3,403 K-12 teachers in 48 states. More than 2,500 responded that they had experienced some type of physical or verbal abuse by a student, a threat of violence, or an inappropriate sexual advance.

The teachers strike in West Virginia may have ended last week when Gov. Jim Justice signed a law giving educators a 5 percent pay increase, but the fight in other states is just warming up.

"You can make anywhere from $5,000 to $20,000 more by driving 15 minutes across the state line," said Dale Lee, president of the West Virginia Education Association. "We're having trouble keeping and attracting young teachers."

When the bell rings at Chicago's Sullivan High School on the city's far north side, it's a familiar scene. Hundreds of students pour into the hallway heading to their next class. What's also becoming increasingly familiar is the presence of two uniformed police officers in the hallway keeping watch. The school resource officers often chat with the students passing by and Sullivan's principal Chad Adams says the officers provide a higher level of security for the school and much more.

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