The teachers strike in West Virginia may have ended last week when Gov. Jim Justice signed a law giving educators a 5 percent pay increase, but the fight in other states is just warming up.

"You can make anywhere from $5,000 to $20,000 more by driving 15 minutes across the state line," said Dale Lee, president of the West Virginia Education Association. "We're having trouble keeping and attracting young teachers."

When the bell rings at Chicago's Sullivan High School on the city's far north side, it's a familiar scene. Hundreds of students pour into the hallway heading to their next class. What's also becoming increasingly familiar is the presence of two uniformed police officers in the hallway keeping watch. The school resource officers often chat with the students passing by and Sullivan's principal Chad Adams says the officers provide a higher level of security for the school and much more.

After canceling Thursday classes and evacuating the building over reports of a bomb, Pickerington High School North announced they have found no threat and will reopen as normal on Friday.

Ohio Statehouse in Columbus
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

State lawmakers have introduced their plan to spend more than $2.6 billion on capital improvements throughout Ohio.

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Another Central Ohio school district is keeping students at home because of a threat.

Groveport Madison Schools Communications Officer Jeff Warner says the district canceled Tuesday classes at all schools because of threats against the district. 

Jo Ingles / Statehouse News Bureau

The Ohio Association of Public School Employees has filed a lawsuit to block a three-year cost of living freeze to retirement benefits.

The shutdown of the state’s largest online charter school – which owes tens of millions of dollars to the state – has thousands of students searching for options in the middle of the school year. And there are also some 800 teachers and faculty from the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow who are now looking for work.

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“School’s just never felt right to me since I was in Kindergarten,” said 18-year-old Abbey Lopez, laughing.

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After the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow's sponsor unanimously voted to shut it down Thursday night, school districts around Ohio are preparing to take in thousands of students affected by the closure.  

"The federal government must take bold action to address inequitable funding in our nation's public schools."

So begins a list of recommendations released Thursday by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, an independent, bipartisan agency created by Congress in 1957 to investigate civil rights complaints. Thursday's report comes after a lengthy investigation into how America's schools are funded and why so many that serve poor and minority students aren't getting the resources they say they need.