redevelopment

Paul Sableman / Flickr

Columbus City Council is looking at an evaluation of its tax incentive program Monday night.  

A new report says Downtown Cleveland has capacity for thousands more housing units, but is lagging in homeowners and should work to preserve affordable housing options.

The report, released Wednesday, was prepared by consulting firm Urban Partners and commissioned by the Downtown Cleveland Alliance, a nonprofit that advocates for the neighborhood.

Housing Demand Expected To Continue

Downtown population has grown about 56 percent since 2010, and the researchers expect continued demand for market-rate housing.

A local entrepreneur is setting out to make the city of Alliance an eccentric tourist destination.

Sherry Groom is the owner of Camelot Community Project, an ongoing effort to bring tourists to Alliance. She purchases run-down buildings downtown and transforms them into quirky, artistic shops with the help of local artists and architects.

Rep. Tim Ryan
WKSU

Ohio’s Rep. Tim Ryan is sponsoring legislation in Congress to increase funding for urban blight cleanup across the country. Ryan, a Democrat, introduced the bill on Tuesday along with Republican William McKinley of West Virginia.

Kabir Bhatia / WKSU

The Innerbelt National Forest is now temporarily open to the public, bringing new green space to downtown Akron.

Construction at River & Rich in Franklinton.
Nick Evans / WOSU

The 200-plus apartment development River and Rich is nearing completion on Franklinton’s east side. The hum of heavy machinery and the staccato thump of nail guns played in the background last week as city leaders gathered to pitch a revamped tax abatement plan.

Construction at River & Rich in Franklinton.
Nick Evans / WOSU

Columbus leaders baked in the Tuesday morning sun at River And Rich to promote a new tax abatement strategy aimed at increasing Columbus’ stock of affordable housing.

Jeremy Palek/Twitter

Demolition of Akron’s Rubber Bowl started on Wednesday, a decade after it ceased to be the stadium for University of Akron football and almost eight decades after it was designed.

Mark Urycki / ideastream

Matthew Woodyard loves cycling so much he’s taken up something called cyclocross – think of it as a biking form of cross-country-running with a few laps around the track mixed in. He also rides his bike to work up and down the steep hills of the Merriman Valley.

Debbie Holmes / WOSU

These days, when the owner of Buckeye Donuts looks outside his door, he doesn’t recognize what he sees.

Construction near Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center.
Nick Evans

A federal tax incentive meant to drive private investment to neglected areas took effect in April for 43 Columbus-area Census tracts. So, why are some of those tracts already flush with private investment?

Jamie Richardson
Nick Evans

White Castle and city leaders broke ground Thursday on a new, $65 million Columbus headquarters. Flanked by a "town cryer" in period costume, a line of dignitaries dug shovel-sized spatulas into the ground next to the burger chain's current home office near Grandview. 

Nick Evans / WOSU

Standing on a corner in the Milo-Grogan neighborhood, Jack Kakura rattles off commute times—seven to 10 minutes to downtown, 10 minutes to the airport, maybe 15 to Easton.

Kukura, who directs investments for Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing, stands in front of two properties his organization developed a number of years ago and set aside as affordable housing for 30 years.

Nick Evans / WOSU

Wednesday evening the courts at Linden Park are full of kids shooting hoops in the fading sunlight. Inside the community center, others play ping pong.

But Columbus Parks spokesperson Sophia Fifner explains the building is pretty old. She walks off looking for the center’s director, and finds a plaque just above an old hearth.

Some walls and boarded storefronts along a couple of east side Cleveland streets are due to get an artistic makeover this summer as "Inner City Hues" brings a series of murals to the neighborhood.  

Bianca Butts came to the Zelma George Recreation Center on a Tuesday night to meet some artists who plan to bring new life to her neighborhood.  The center sits in between Buckeye and Kinsman roads, two major east-west thoroughfares running through the east side of Cleveland.  Once bustling arteries, the streets are now home to some shops, and many abandoned businesses.

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