police

Andy Chow / Statehouse News Bureau

The emergence of police body cameras has caused several communities to solve their own questions about what is and is not public record. Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther joined with Republican state Rep. Niraj Antani to introduce a bill that would provide some definitions.

FIle photo

Democratic Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther joins a Republican state lawmaker on Monday to outline a bill that seeks to clarify Ohio law on when police body camera footage is public record.

Donald W. Cook is a Los Angeles attorney with decades of experience bringing lawsuits over police dog bites — and mostly losing. He blames what he calls "The Rin Tin Tin Effect" — juries think of police dogs as noble, and have trouble visualizing how violent they can be during an arrest.

A new report assessing the use of body cameras raises concerns that police departments could misuse the video footage.  As ideastream’s Mark Urycki reports, police departments in Akron, Columbus, Cincinnati, and Cleveland are among those distributing body cameras to its officers.  

 

 

Civil rights organizations The Leadership Conference and Upturn have issued a scorecard measuring 8 concerns about body cameras and not many departments meet their standards. 

The report states:

Andrew Welsh-Huggins / Associated Press

Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther announced a comprehensive neighborhood safety strategy on Thursday, expected to be submitted at next week’s City Council meeting.

Any American who pays attention to law enforcement has heard of the strategies: "broken windows," "stop and frisk," "zero tolerance." These are all variations on what's broadly known as "proactive policing": efforts to seek out and prevent the causes of crime before it happens, as opposed to a more reactive policy of just sending police when called.

Beginning in January 2018, Cincinnati Police will dispatch a member of a newly created Women Helping Women special team called DVERT (Domestic Violence Emergency Response Team) to the scene of domestic violence and sexual assault crimes.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine is rolling out his 12-point Recovery Ohio plan in Cincinnati. It's aimed at tackling the opioid epidemic, but it will have larger law enforcement benefits.

Having police officers wear little cameras seems to have no discernible impact on citizen complaints or officers' use of force, at least in the nation's capital.

That's the conclusion of a study performed as Washington, D.C., rolled out its huge camera program. The city has one of the largest forces in the country, with some 2,600 officers now wearing cameras on their collars or shirts.

A member of Ohio's police-community collaborative board says Thursday night's meeting at the University of Cincinnati was one of the best attended on the road. But Karhlton Moore admits low turnout remains a challenge. The room was less than half full and many of those present were law enforcement officers.

Pages