oil and gas drilling

Ohio EPA

West Virginia regulators have issued a $430,000 fine for permit violations against the company behind the 713-mile Rover Pipeline, which has racked up millions of dollars in damages from its construction through Ohio.

Allegheny Front

After 40 years, Kerri and Jeff Bond are moving from their small farm in Seneca Lake, Ohio. The rural hillsides have changed in recent years. The trees in their yard started to lose foliage and die last year. Their sheep, chickens and cats died, and their dogs developed tumors.

WMFD/Screenshot by WOSU

The Rover Pipeline’s corporate parent came under cyber-attack this week, according to Bloomberg News, as did three other natural gas transmission companies. Energy Transfer Partners says its electronic communication system was shut down in the attack, but no data was compromised.

Inequities in the dollars used to fund schools have been a problem in Ohio for decades.

Education funding depends on local home values, business investments, levies that pass or fail, and in some areas, it also depends on whether a natural gas pipeline runs through your school district.

In a fairly rural district in Northeast Ohio, the construction of a controversial pipeline could mean a multi-million-dollar windfall, and after years of belt-tightening, district officials are dreaming up potential ways to spend it.

Cloverleaf Local Schools

Workers move a section of well casing into place at a Chesapeake Energy natural gas well site near Burlington, Pa., in Bradford County.
Ralph Wilson / AP

A Central Ohio lawmaker is seeking a ban on fracking in certain parts of the state. The proposal follows the first meeting of the Ohio Oil and Gas Leasing Commission, which regulates this type of drilling.

It's been four years since an oil pipeline in Colerain Township ruptured, spewing thousands of gallons of crude down a hillside creek at Oak Glen Nature Preserve. In 2016, the focus shifted from cleaning the site, to restoration. That process is nearing completion.

The United States oil business is booming and the country could soon be the largest crude oil producer in the world. Despite this record-breaking production, climate change activists campaigning to move away from fossil fuels say they are making progress.

The U.S. is one of only a few countries in the world that allow private individuals to own the minerals under their land, a policy that dates to the Founding Fathers as they sought to elevate private interests over those of the British Crown. This financial incentive to allow new drilling goes a long way in explaining the nation's natural gas boom. The National Association of Royalty Owners estimates some 12 million American landowners receive royalties for the exploitation of oil, gas and other mineral resources under their property.

The nation's rush to increase oil production is having a long-distance impact on the Great Lakes region.

Geologic formations have given parts of the region ample deposits of sand, including the hard, round version that is used in fracking. Seen from space a few months ago by the Landsat 8 satellite, the light brown mines dot a landscape of green fields and forests. 

Reid Frazier / Allegheny Front

A petrochemical company from Thailand that has already invested $100 million in a facility in eastern Ohio is considering making an even bigger investment. But it’s not a done deal.

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