ohio secretary of state

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling has cleared the way for states to take a tougher approach to maintaining their voter rolls, but will they?

John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Secretary of State says no voters will be removed from the rolls before the November election, in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding Ohio’s process of deleting inactive voters’ registrations.

Updated 6:34 p.m. ET

An ideologically split U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld Ohio's controversial "use-it-or-lose-it" voting law by a 5-to-4 margin. The law allows the state to strike voters from the registration rolls if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form, and don't vote for another four years, or two federal election cycles.

Failure to vote

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that Ohio can clean up its voting rolls by clearing people who haven't voted in a while.

On Monday at 10 a.m., the Supreme Court might release opinions in a number of significant cases on this year's docket, deciding the fate of President Trump's travel ban, public sector unions and political redistricting — among other possibilities.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court may decide a case that could change how Ohio removes people from voter rolls. The court heard arguments in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute in January. 

Federal law lays out a process for taking people’s names off the registered voter list if they have moved to a new address and haven’t updated election officials.

Secretary of State Jon Husted casts an early in-person absentee ballot at the Franklin County Board of Elections early voting center.
Dan Konik / Ohio Public Radio

Ohio voters are a week into early voting for the May primary. They're deciding hundreds of local issues, a major statewide issue on how Congressional maps are drawn and the party candidates for five major statewide offices.

Kathleen Clyde/Ohio House

Democrat Kathleen Clyde was in Akron on Monday to discuss her run for Ohio’s Secretary of State.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Ohio officials and civil liberty advocates are in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday for a U.S. Supreme Court case that could have implications for how several states update their voter rolls.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided Wednesday over whether Ohio's so-called use-it-or-lose-it voter registration rule violates federal law.

Ohio, which has the most aggressive voter-purge system in the country, currently strikes voters from the registration rolls if they fail to vote in two consecutive elections — and if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form.

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