ohio secretary of state

David Pepper, Ohio Democratic Party Chairman, with the party's statewide candidates
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

Now that we're past Labor Day, political campaigns are intensifying. It's the time when voters are more likely to pay attention to the choices they will be making in November.

County boards of elections in Ohio are bringing in experts to size up whether their computer systems are vulnerable to hackers.

At a panel on voting issues in Beachwood Wednesday night, the two major party candidates for secretary of state discussed several election issues that are rarely debated. 

State Rep. Kathleen Clyde, D-Kent, and State Sen. Frank LaRose, R-Hudson, agreed without hesitation that there needs to be a higher threshold for getting constitutional amendments on the ballot.

Group of Libertarians arrive at the Ohio Secretary of State’s office to deliver petitions to put Charlie Earl on the ballot as a presidential nominee. Earl would then be swapped out for Gary Johnson.
Jo Ingles / Ohio Public Radio

The Libertarian Party of Ohio has officially regained “minor party” status in the state.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted is taking extra steps to clarify the state's process for clearing voter rolls, outlining some new initiatives aimed at helping voters stay up-to-date.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

It was a busy holiday for Ohio groups behind two new constitutional amendments headed to ballots in the fall. Both proposals got thousands of petition signatures, but they still have their critics.

John Minchillo / Associated Press

While many Ohioans are enjoying picnics, parades and fireworks, community activists are hustling to meet the July 4 deadline for getting their ballot issue in front of voters.

Jay LaPrete / Associated Press

A U.S. Supreme Court ruling has cleared the way for states to take a tougher approach to maintaining their voter rolls, but will they?

John Minchillo / Associated Press

The Secretary of State says no voters will be removed from the rolls before the November election, in spite of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding Ohio’s process of deleting inactive voters’ registrations.

Updated 6:34 p.m. ET

An ideologically split U.S. Supreme Court Monday upheld Ohio's controversial "use-it-or-lose-it" voting law by a 5-to-4 margin. The law allows the state to strike voters from the registration rolls if they fail to return a mailed address confirmation form, and don't vote for another four years, or two federal election cycles.

Failure to vote

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