obamacare

Paul Vernon / Associated Press

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU Public Media, Mike Thompson and Steve Brown discuss the latest gubernatorial debate and how Obamacare has become a key issue in the campaign.

Affordable Care Act Revisit

Aug 7, 2018
Chuck Kennedy / Official White House Archives

Columbus is one of four cities suing the Trump Administration for its plans to undermine the Affordable care Act.

The suit is based on the "take care" clause in the U.S. Constitution that details the President's responsibility to, "take care that the laws be faithfully executed."

Critics say the Trump Administation has undercut the ACA by removing funding for naivgators who assist civilians in choosing their health plans, getting rid of the individual mandate, and suspending the risk adjustment program designed to help smooth out bumps for insurance companies.

President Trump has consistently declared that the Affordable Care Act — commonly referred to as Obamacare — is a broken mess, and after several unsuccessful attempts to repeal the national health care law, he has eagerly anticipated that it will "fail" and "implode."

Pablo Martinez / Associated Press

The City of Columbus announced on Thursday it's filing a lawsuit against the Trump Administration for its treatment of the Affordable Care Act.

Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during the Ohio State of the State address in the Fritsche Theater at Otterbein University in Westerville, Tuesday, March 6, 2018.
Paul Vernon / Associated Press

Gov. John Kasich says Ohio should be doing everything it can to defend the Affordable Care Act's requirement of health care coverage for people with pre-existing conditions. This once again positions Kasich against President Donald Trump, who has said his administration will not fight for the law.

Final 2018 open enrollment numbers for the Affordable Care Act are out this week, and 230,000 Ohioans have signed up, a decrease of about 4 percent from last year.

Ohio ranks 13th of 39 states in the number of new consumers and re-enrollments. The majority of sign-ups came from people between the ages of 55 and 64.

The Trump administration says many of the organizations that help people enroll in health plans on the federal insurance marketplaces don't provide enough bang for the buck, sometimes costing thousands of dollars to sign up each customer. So it is cutting their funding, some by as much as 90 percent, the government told the groups last week.

It wasn't that long ago that the effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act died once and for all in the Senate.

Heritage Pursuit

The lone U.S. county currently at risk of going uncovered on the federal health law's insurance exchanges has landed an insurer.

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Aug 7, 2017
Alexander Smith / Wikimedia Commons

Opponents of the Issue 2 Ohio ballot have raised $15.8 million and donated that money to a non-profit known as "Ohioans Against the Deceptive Rx Ballot Issue LLC. " If passed, Issue 2 will prevent Ohio from paying more on prescription drugs than the U.S. Veterans Administration pays.

Coming up, we're talking about opioids and Issue 2 and the latest in state news with a panel of reporters. 

House Republicans are mulling over new changes to their health care proposal, hoping to wrangle enough votes to pass a bill that would allow them to keep their campaign pledge to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

The latest proposal allows states to make changes to the ACA's rules governing health insurance policies and markets, in an effort to allow some states to offer stripped-down policies with lower premiums.

New data from the U.S. Census Bureau present the most detailed picture yet of the dramatic rise in the number of people covered by health insurance since the Affordable Care Act went into effect.

County-level data going back to 2010, when the law was signed, show a patchwork of people living without health insurance that ticked down slowly for the first three years under the ACA. But once the online insurance exchanges opened at the end of 2013 and Medicaid expanded, the population living without coverage dropped noticeably.

Repeal and replace is on-again, off-again, but that doesn't mean the rules affecting your insurance will stay the same in the meantime.

The Trump administration late Thursday issued a final rule aimed at stabilizing the existing health law's insurance marketplace that could have rapid, dramatic effects — perhaps as soon as early summer — on people who do not get insurance through work, and buy it on the Affordable Care Act's exchanges instead.

The Affordable Care Act's worst enemies are now in charge of the vast range of health coverage the law created. They're also discussing changes that could affect a wider net of employment-based policies and Medicare coverage for seniors.

Although Republicans failed last month in their first attempt to repeal and replace the ACA, President Donald Trump vows the effort will continue. And even if Congress does nothing, Trump has suggested he might sit by and "let Obamacare explode."

Updated July 19 at 2:30 p.m. ET

Repealing the Affordable Care Act was at the top of Republicans' policy wish list ever since the law was passed in 2010. Seven years later, having gained the White House and majorities in both houses of Congress, the GOP apparently has failed to repeal that law, also known as Obamacare.

However, that doesn't mean Obamacare itself is untouchable. While Congress faltered, the White House still has lots of power.

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