Net Neutrality

Tech Tuesday: ZTE, Net Neutrality, and the latest from E3

Jun 12, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Chinese tech company ZTE violated U.S. sanctions against North Korea and Iran by selling devices with American parts to those countries. In response to the violations, the U.S. imposed fines on ZTE. Last week, President Trump negotiated down the fines to a level that wouldn't harm the company. We discuss what the deal means for the tech industry.

Also , the FCC repeal of net neutrality went into effect on Monday. We get the latest from that, as well as the latest from the Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3. 

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

While the Senate voted last week to bring back “net neutrality” protections, Sen. Rob Portman says he’s looking for another option. The Ohio Republican voted against the Democrat-backed bill, which is not expected to pass the House.

Tech Tuesday: Net Neutrality and the Hack of Securus

May 22, 2018
The north wing of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C is home to the Senate.
Sebastian Vital / Flickr

The U.S. Senate passed a resolution last week aiming to reverse the 2017 decision by the FCC to deregulate internet service providers. However, experts doubt the move will be met with approval from House Republicans or President Trump. We explore the issue in the second hour of our program today.

We will also look into a hacker breach of a company called Securus, which has allowed police in the U.S. to track private cell phones, and catch up on the latest in tech releases. 

Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

While President Trump and the Russia investigation continue to dominate headlines, for Sen. Sherrod Brown, the top concerns on Capitol Hill this week are net neutrality, NAFTA, health care and infrastructure.

Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET

The Senate approved a resolution Wednesday to nullify the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rollback, dealing a symbolic blow to the FCC's new rule that remains on track to take effect next month.

The final vote was 52-47. As expected, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, joined Democrats in voting to overturn the FCC's controversial decision. But two other Republicans — Sen. John Kennedy of Louisiana and Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — also voted in favor of the resolution of disapproval.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The U.S. Senate is set to vote this week on a resolution to undo the Trump administration’s repeal of “net neutrality” rules. Senate Democrats are forcing the vote less than a month before the new rules are scheduled to take effect.

The Federal Communications Commission says that its order ending an era of "net neutrality" — the rules that restrict Internet service providers' ability to slow down or speed up users' access to specific websites and apps — will take effect on June 11.

That is one day before the Senate's June 12 deadline to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution filed by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass. The resolution aims to overturn the FCC's repeal of the Obama administration's Open Internet Order of 2015, which officially established net neutrality.

The Federal Communications Commission is working toward officially taking current net neutrality rules off the books. The agency took the requisite formal step of publishing the rules on Thursday, opening the door for lawsuits from a number of state attorneys general and advocacy groups.

Net Neutrality demonstration in Washington, D.C. on December 14, 2017.
Slowking4 / Wikimedia Commons

The Federal Communications Commission repealed the Obama-era net neutrality rules in December but the battle is far from over. Litigation is expected on several fronts and some states, not including Ohio, are working on legislation to regulate internet service providers.

J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

Republican Rep. Steve Stivers of Upper Arlington is a lead co-sponsor on a bill introduced this week aimed at replacing net neutrality, called the Open Internet Preservation Act. But Internet lobby groups say it falls short of the necessary protections.

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