medical marijuana

Weekly Reporter Roundtable

Feb 26, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

Ohio politicians have called for action on guns and school safety in the aftermath of the Parkland, Fla.  school shooting. Background checks, bans on assault rifles, and arming staff on school campuses have been among the proposed solutions. This comes as several Ohio schools closed Friday after a flurry of violent threats were made to their campuses. 

We'll also take a look at Ohio's medical marijuana program, the proposed education overhaul, and more from the Ohio Statehouse. 

A medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles.
Richard Vogel / Associated Press

Ohio lawmakers are now weighing in with a proposed fix for problems with the process being used by the state commerce department in the medical marijuana program.

Legal Marijuana Oregon
Gosia Wozniacka / Associated Press

Ohio’s Auditor says it’s probably too late for the state Department of Commerce to pause its medical marijuana processes to fix problems. He’s telling the department to focus now instead on defending lawsuits.

State auditor candidate Keith Faber criticized Ohio’s medical marijuana roll-out today at the Akron Press Club. 

A medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles.
Richard Vogel / Associated Press

The agency that oversees Ohio’s medical marijuana program admits there are problems with the scoring process used to grant medical marijuana growing licenses. 

A Cincinnati company denied a medical marijuana cultivation license is calling on a judge to get involved in the selection process. This in the wake of recent concerns by Ohio Auditor Dave Yost that some scores may have been changed.

Legal Marijuana Oregon
Gosia Wozniacka / Associated Press

Ohio’s auditor has found a big problem with the process for scoring applications from those interested in growing medical marijuana for the state’s new program.

Across the country, states desperate to prevent opioid addiction are considering medical cannabis as a solution.

Citing the opioid crisis, lawmakers in several states are looking to initiate or expand their medical marijuana programs including KentuckyNew YorkNew Jersey and Indiana. And in Illinois, where opioids have claimed nearly 11,000 lives over the past decade, the legislature is considering a measure that would allow patients with an opioid prescription get access to marijuana instead.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

Prosecutors in San Francisco will throw out thousands of marijuana-related convictions of residents dating back to 1975.

San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón said Wednesday that his office will dismiss and seal 3,038 misdemeanor convictions dating back before the state's legalization of marijuana went into effect, with no action necessary from those who were convicted.

Prosecutors will also review up to 4,940 felony convictions and consider reducing them to misdemeanors.

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