Medicaid

Ohio Hospital Groups Urge Government To Renew CHIP Funding

Jan 16, 2018
Summa Health Systems

A coalition of Ohio hospital groups and state agencies are urging passage of the federal Children’s Health Insurance Program or CHIP.

On Friday, Kentucky became the first state with federal approval to implement a so-called work requirement for Medicaid recipients. The commonwealth is one of ten states, including Indiana, that have requested approval from the federal government for such a provision.


The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has announced it will support state policies that require people to work for their Medicaid coverage. Ten states —including Indiana and Kentucky — have submitted proposals to add a so-called work requirement to their Medicaid plans.

Pablo Martinez / Associated Press

The Trump Administration is clearing the way for states to attach work requirements for Medicaid, an announcement that sparked outrage among health care advocates. The decision may mean some changes for the Ohio's Medicaid program.

Updated at 11:29 a.m. ET

The Trump administration is encouraging states to require "able-bodied" Medicaid recipients to work or volunteer in order to keep their health insurance coverage.

On Thursday, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, which is part of the Department of Health and Human Services, issued new guidelines for states that want some adults to work in exchange for the health insurance coverage.

The expansion of Medicaid helps rural hospitals stay afloat in states like Colorado, which added 400,000 people to the health insurance program under the Affordable Care Act.

Hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid were about 6 times less likely to close than hospitals in non-expansion states, according to a study by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

The study was published Monday in the January edition of the journal Health Affairs.

Pixabay

Ohio is expanding Medicaid coverage for acupuncture. Last fall, it began approving payment for the non-drug pain treatment if it was provided by medical doctors. But thousands more practitioners will be included in the New Year.

Lt. Governor Mary Taylor is one of the most politically-connected people in Ohio, but says she still felt helpless about her sons' addictions.
Andy Chow

Ohio’s Lieutenant Governor - who is running for the Republican nomination for governor next year - is pushing a plan to deal with opioids that some consider unusual, especially given her opposition to Medicaid expansion.

The Trump Administration has signaled it’ll give flexibility to states when it comes to how they operate their Medicaid programs. That will likely open the door for Ohio to implement a controversial measure.

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