Medicaid

Jr de Barbosa / Wikimedia Commons

The Ohio Department of Medicaid announced that Medicaid will begin covering more medications to help with drug withdrawal symptoms, beginning in January.

Jacqueline Abney is recovering from sustance abuse at Beacon House in Wooster.
Ohio Public Radio

Jacqueline Abney lives in the Beacon House, a residential treatment center that looks just like any other home you would see in the historic downtown area of Wooster. The only difference: Jacqueline is living with several other women struggling with substance abuse disorder.

Gov. John Kasich talks about the latest official fatal overdose numbers from the Ohio Department of Health at a Statehouse press conference.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Gov. John Kasich says his Medicaid department has made some changes to required background checks on behavioral and mental health providers – a requirement that came from an executive order he signed in July. The change is good news to hundreds of providers who feared for their jobs.

Updated at 11:13 p.m. ET

Immigrants who benefit from various forms of public assistance, including food stamps and housing subsidies, would face sharp new hurdles to obtaining a green card under a proposed rule announced by the Trump administration on Saturday.

opioids and prescription medicine bottle
Flickr

Ohio Medicaid says it will continue to enforce a new rule requiring background checks of Medicaid providers. Some of them say the new practice will cost some good providers their jobs and will worsen tight staffing situations.

Hundreds of mental health and addiction counselors could lose their jobs because the state is now requiring criminal background checks for people who provide Medicaid services.

The director of Ohio's Medicaid Department, Barbara Sears, stopped in Cincinnati Tuesday to talk about a recently released study on the benefits of Medicaid expansion in the state.

Four years after going out on a limb to get Medicaid expansion enacted in Ohio, outgoing Republican Gov. John Kasich is worried about the future of the program. So he is now defending it — through a study and through the stories of people who have benefited from the coverage expansion.

pills
Pixabay

The state auditor is urging lawmakers to tell Ohio Medicaid to halt its plan to change its contracts with two pharmacy benefits managers over the way those prescription drug middlemen price their services.

Healthcare Costs / Flickr

In this week's Snollygoster, Ohio's politics podcast from WOSU Public Media, Steve Brown and Ann Fisher discuss the large profits made by middlemen through managing pharmacy benefits for the state's Medicaid program.

Ohio Republican Governor candidate Mike DeWine speaks while running mate Jon Husted looks on.
John Minchillo / Associated Press

Republican candidate for governor Mike DeWine and his running mate Jon Husted announced a new wellness initiative at a campaign event on Tuesday in Cleveland. The proposed plan would first roll out for all state employees, then eventually for people on Medicaid.

Several states are questioning the cost of using pharmacy middlemen to manage their prescription drug programs in a movement that could shake up the complex system that manages how pharmaceuticals are priced and paid for.

Brennan Linsley / Associated Press

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Rich Cordray is doubling down on his support for Medicaid expansion and its economic viability. Cordray, along with Gov. John Kasich's administration, says the program is sustainable and needs to remain consistent.

CareSource Says Opioid Prescriptions Down 40 Percent

Aug 1, 2018

Ohio's largest Medicaid plan says the amount of opioids prescribed to its members has decreased 40 percent over the past 18 months.

CareSource announced Monday it plans to reduce that number by 50 percent by the end of this year.

The Dayton-based organization privately manages 1.8 million Medicaid plans. It says it notifies providers who prescribe a large amount of opioids to members, and can identify members at risk for substance misuse.

When Toni and Jim Hoy adopted their son Daniel as a toddler, they did not plan to give him back to the state of Illinois 10 years later.

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