march for science

Organizers of Saturday's nationwide March for Science have some pretty lofty goals: supporting science "as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity." Promoting "evidence-based policies in the public interest." Oh, and don't forget highlighting "the very real role that science plays in each of our lives and the need to respect and encourage research that gives us insight into the world."

Whoa, that's a lot of exalted ground to cover with one cardboard sign!

Bradhoc / Flickr

This Earth Day, tens of thousands of people are expected to take part in a “March for Science” in Washington, D.C., and at hundreds of satellite marches across the country - including Columbus. 

Science and Politics

Apr 20, 2017
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Conrad Johnson / U.S. Army RDECOM

Scientists across the country are taking to the streets this weekend to march for science. The march was inspired by the success of the Women's March in January and is meant to be a response to political policies that are at odds with scientific findings and principals. However, some scientists argue that science should remain unpolitical, and that a march undermines the credibility of the field. Join us today as we discuss the March for Science and the intersection of science and politics with a panel of guests.

Guests: