Larry Obhof

Ann Sanner

All Ohio state lawmakers must receive sexual harassment training following a wave of the sexual misconduct scandals that swept the nation and forced resignations in both chambers of Ohio's state Legislature.

Ohio Budget Director Tim Keen (from left), House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger, Governor John Kasich and Senate President Larry Obhof discuss changes to the state budget.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

At the beginning of 2017, as President Trump took office, Ohio lawmakers were focused on the new two-year state budget.

Wind turbines in Blue Creek Township in Paulding County, Ohio.
Nyttend / Wikimedia Commons

The Republican leader of the Ohio Senate plans to deliver the final blow to Ohio’s green energy benchmarks, which require utilities to get a certain amount of energy from renewable sources. 

Bill O'Neill
Bill O'Neill

The only Democrat on the Ohio Supreme Court announced in October that he intends to run for governor next year, but Bill O’Neill now says he won’t leave the bench until January 26. State lawmakers may try to force him out sooner.

Julie Carr Smyth / Associated Press

Ohio Senate has passed another abortion ban – this one aimed at diagnoses of Down Syndrome – sparking a silent protest from abortion rights activists in the Senate chamber.

There’s about a month left for legislators to get anything done before the new year. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, there’s one issue that the top Senate leader specifically wants to move forward in that time.

Senate President Larry Obhof says it’s time to pass a bill that reforms the state’s unemployment compensation program.

In the past month two lawmakers and one high-ranking staffer have resigned under the guise of “inappropriate conduct.” But that phrase can be attributed to a wide-range of infractions. The Senate president says their goal is to be as transparent as possible.

Ohio Budget Director Tim Keen (from left), House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger, Governor John Kasich and Senate President Larry Obhof discuss changes to the state budget.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

State lawmakers overrode six of Gov. John Kasich’s 47 budget vetoes. But one headline-making veto may survive – the one that stops a plan to ask the federal government to increase the tax on managed-care organizations. 

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville), Gov. John Kasich and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) appear at a press conference about the budget in April.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Republican leaders are ready to deliver another blow to Gov. John Kasich. The Senate is likely to give final approval to at least some veto overrides that started in the House. The vote would be more than just a symbolic loss of power for the Kasich Administration.

House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville), Gov. John Kasich and Senate President Larry Obhof (R-Medina) appear at a press conference about the budget in April.
Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Last month, state representatives voted to override a budget veto for the first time in 40 years. They actually overrode 11 of Gov. John Kasich’s 47 vetoes. Senators are now deciding which of those overrides to vote on, and that they may ask the House to consider overriding more vetoes.

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